Type of Mower

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by grobbins6, Jun 17, 2008.

  1. grobbins6

    grobbins6 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 45

    Hello all-

    Excellent site you have here, I am glad I stumbled upon it.

    I am looking for some advice regarding a mower for my new home. There is about 1/2 acre of yard which includes 2 planting beds and 9 trees/shrubs for obstacles. Fairly standard except there is a 100' x 30' section that is on a 30 degree slope. The bottom of the slope transitions immediately to landscaping; there is no flat spot to turn around.

    I am doing it now with a push mower and cleats. Not fun. I am hoping to find something with a bigger deck to cut down on overall mowing time and that can be used on the slope.

    I borrowed a lawn tractor to try it out and it was less than safe. There is one small section where there is no at the bottom of the slope. I was able to go up without the bagger but it was a little bit scary and going down must be done without brakes to avoid locking and spinning (very scary). When going across the slope, the uphill tire would lose traction and spin resulting in no forward progress.

    Looking into it a little bit makes me think a tractor with better tires, wheel weights and rigging the seat switch to let me sit on the fender might work but I can't imagine it is a good idea. Self-propelled push mower is what I had been thinking but after reading here for a while, I am curious about walk-behinds. I have never used a walk behind and don't know what their capabilities are (especially on slopes).

    Any advice or recommendations would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!!
     
  2. LarryF

    LarryF LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,171

    30 degrees is a very steep slope and no lawn tractor or ZTR should be used on it. My slopes are similar and I use a quick 36 for them. Not easy, but it was the best I could find short of shelling out about $6K for a dual-hydro walk behind. Besides, the dual-hydro 36" walk behinds weigh twice as much as mine, which I considered to be a big negative. Some of my hills are steeper than 30 degrees and I use a string trimmer for those. Where in the northeast are you? If you are in NJ, you're welcome to come try my mower.
     
  3. jkason

    jkason LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 548

    Whatever you buy, put aside money for another one down the line.

    30 degrees is too much slope for anything but a 2-cycle to get sufficient lubrication.
     
  4. grobbins6

    grobbins6 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 45

    LarryF - Thanks for the offer, but I am in Mass. Do you go up/down or across the slope? Could you turn the Quick around on the slope? It seems that up/down is the way to go, but to do that I would have to turn 180deg on the slope because of the landscaping at the bottom.

    jkason - Your bring up an excellent point. Am I better off getting a self-propelled push mower (much less $$ but longer mow time) and replace it when the engine goes?
     
  5. grobbins6

    grobbins6 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 45

    Not sure if this will help, but this is what I am dealing with.

    slope.jpg
     
  6. FDuce

    FDuce LawnSite Member
    Posts: 178

  7. jkason

    jkason LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 548

    Get a good, used, hydrostatic walk-behind (commercial) mower. It will last for years on that slope. (Still not good for the engine, though.)

    Depends on you. My "down time" is worth more to me than trudging up and down some lame-@$$ hill.
     
  8. BUCKEYE MOWING

    BUCKEYE MOWING LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,169

    Wait for a QUICK 44 Dual Drive.
     
  9. LarryF

    LarryF LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,171

    Good photo, it clearly shows what you are up against. I don't know if I'd want to tackle that hill with my Quick 36, but if I did, I'd go up and down. But I certainly wouldn't try it when the grass is wet. Turning at the bottom would be a problem, but I guess there's no reason you can't walk on the bed. The Q36 has a right-hand-thumb-activated reverse that will assist in turning on a dime (well, almost :)). I think going diagonally at a 45-degree angle from the road would also work.

    I believe a professional lawn guy would use a dual-hydro across the face of the hill; something like an Exmark Turf Tracer, perhaps
     
  10. FDuce

    FDuce LawnSite Member
    Posts: 178

Share This Page