University study on cutting wet grass?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by fastlane, Jul 27, 2013.

  1. goodgreen

    goodgreen LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 363

    You can have the same problem with people who water 2-3 times a day everyday. I don't get that excessiveness at all....
     
  2. vegandude

    vegandude LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 450

    Under powered engines and letting it clump under the deck-bad,bad,bad
     
  3. shovelracer

    shovelracer LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,009

    That is an interesting take because as an applicator who does know what he is doing, I find the biggest culprit for lawn stress and damage is directly related to homeowners and new or mow n go operator's cutting practices. In the end, to get the best possible results one needs to have the entire spectrum of maintenance operations work together. When you get more than one hand in jar it becomes a recipe for problems. Fert company sprays 10 minutes after the cutter leaves. Homeowner or new guys ripping it down to 2" week after week. Mow n go running over south facing lawns at 1pm on a 95+ degree day.

    Cutting wet grass is sort of part of the business, but the overall best thing for any lawn is minimize it when possible by working around irrigation schedules, natural dew and shade affected areas, etc. Not much you can do otherwise when it rains a week straight, other than take the extra steps to keep things clean and sharp, stand up laying turf, etc.
     
  4. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    I agree that real world results are what counts, in that,, all the relevant factors to 'your' business are included, whereas a Uni. study would not be able to address every situation...
    With that in mind it would be wise for 'pros' to analyze the structure of their soils on a regular basis,,, esp. the clayey and heavier ones with relation to how water/irrigation is affecting the roots...

    I noticed in this thread, that very little attn. was paid to the soil... :)
     
  5. vegandude

    vegandude LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 450

    There's a fert company here that starts their season in March and by the end of April they will have 2nd app down, by the time the ground warms enough for the nitro to work, a third app is down and the lawn is growing 8-9 " per week(I've measured it). When I take a new lawn on and I find out this company's doing the fert, automatic surcharge or I just won't take it on. A fert company that I do recommend works with me and together we come out with great looking lawns. In my experience the fert company usually has biggest impact.
     
  6. 93Chevy

    93Chevy LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 37,805

    I could venture a guess and say that those fast growing lawns burn out fast in the summer heat. Just my experience with heavy nitrogen apps.
     
  7. vegandude

    vegandude LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 450

    Big time burn-out. What's really awesome is that this time year they love to show up and boil the lawn with the overheated stuff in the hoses. :hammerhead::hammerhead:
     
  8. Exact Rototilling

    Exact Rototilling LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,355

    I'm assuming this is cool season turf?

    Wonder how much they put down in the Fall when MOST of the entire growing seasons Nitrogen should go down...? As in 65-75%...?
     
  9. GrassGuerilla

    GrassGuerilla LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,437

    The cutting deck makes a huge difference too. Most fabbed decks suck when it comes to wet grass. When the ground gets soggy for weeks on end, out come the old Toro proline WBs, and park the Z's. Production suffers, but so does rutting up a yard, or having to recover a stuck mower.
     
  10. GrassGuerilla

    GrassGuerilla LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,437

    The cutting deck makes a huge difference too. Most fabbed decks suck when it comes to wet grass. When the ground gets soggy for weeks on end, out come the old Toro proline WBs, and park the Z's. Production suffers, but so does rutting up a yard, or having to recover a stuck mower.
     

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