Updated Hardscape Trailer

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by E-mans Hardscapes, Jul 5, 2014.

  1. E-mans Hardscapes

    E-mans Hardscapes LawnSite Member
    Posts: 172

    We had a rain day this past week and decided the trailer could use a makeover. The original shelving and hooks were installed about 5 years ago and were starting to fall apart. Here's what it looked like last week. [​IMG]




    Here's some updated pictures.
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    It's going to be a dream to work out of!
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  2. WorldsStrongestLandscaper

    WorldsStrongestLandscaper LawnSite Member
    Posts: 243

    Very nice...how long is trailer....looks to be more than enough room .
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  3. alldayrj

    alldayrj LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,768

    Nice setup. Whats on the clipboards? I find myself bringing 3 or 4 wheelbarrows on the multi day jobs lately, can't ever have enough!

    Oh and the keyboardhardscaper says you don't need this trailer
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  4. E-mans Hardscapes

    E-mans Hardscapes LawnSite Member
    Posts: 172

    The trailer is 12'. There's plenty of room now for extra wheelies, edger, sod cutter, or anything else I need to haul. Having the trailer is great. If it's a multi day job the trailer stays at the job site. Lock up all your tools and not have to worry about forgetting something.
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  5. E-mans Hardscapes

    E-mans Hardscapes LawnSite Member
    Posts: 172

    Each jobs paperwork is put on a clipboard for me. Directions to the job. Sales order for the material. Equipment needed. And the design.
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  6. locallawncare.ca

    locallawncare.ca LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ontario
    Posts: 756

    Looks sweet, I like the multiple uses for the PVC pipe.
     
  7. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,412

    An enclosed trailer is not a necessity. If you live in an apartment, townhouse, or dense area, and don't have a yard / shop, then an enclosed trailer is a perfect solution and highly recommended.

    So it's taking multiple trips to mobilize. One trip to get the trailer to the site. Then another trip to get the machine (skid steer) to the site. Or some guys will send 2-3 trucks to a job at one time. Or if you only send one truck to the job, then you're having to haul the skid steer the day/night before and drop it off, and then return the day you initially start with the enclosed trailer. Either way, its incurring unnecessary consumption of fuel. The idea in business is to spend as little money as possible on fuel, vehicle expense, and labor. I survived a severe recession in our area, it's been an eye opener on operating with what you can do without.

    The ideal set up would be a double stacker trailer like some of the people we race with have. Pull the double stacker with the dump truck. Have all the tools inside, along with the skid steer. All in one trip with one truck.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2014
  8. E-mans Hardscapes

    E-mans Hardscapes LawnSite Member
    Posts: 172

    How about the amount of time you spend loading and unloading the tools in your truck? Say you need to put a pallet of brick in the back of your truck, do you move all the tools out and then reload? When it's raining do you quick throw everything in the cab? How do you fit your compactor, cut off saws, lazers, adhesive, poly sand, hammer drill, grinder and all the other tools in the cab of your truck?? So you spend more on fuel but save time in other ways. Plus who wouldn't want a big ass billboard with there company's name on it? It's a no-brainer to me.
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  9. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,412

    We spend very little time loading and unloading tools. And the time we spend is probably no more than the time people spend loading and unloading an enclosed trailer. I'm about to head out for the day, and this will probably be my last post for the next few days are busy, but I'll explain why:

    See, when anyone does a typical hardscape job, you have phases. You don't need all the tools and supplies at once. So throwing a pallet of pavers on a truck bed loaded full with tools isn't a common occurrence. Primarily because the truck bed only has the tools needed. Our truck bed measures 8x15, so plenty of room.

    The first phase is the site prep. The excavating. Usually day one. So on day one, you don't need grinders. You don't need bags of poly sand. you don't need adhesive. You don't need bags of grass seed. You don't need a blower. All you need is the tools/machine to excavate. This usually consists of a tape measure, shovels, rakes, a pick, a digging bar, a laser level, a skid steer or a Dingo type of machine, plate compactor, and a 15' roll of filter cloth. Once in a while there are things to be demoed, such as a concrete walk, old patio, etc.

    We clean up as we go. So, any tools / equipment / materials that is no longer needed are taken off the property at the end of the day. An example is filter cloth - we cut what we need, and usually take the roll back to the yard.

    The next phase is the paver and/or block installation. At this point you'll need your paver saw, your grinder and some other stuff. You bring this out with you the day you need it. Keeping things such as electric grinders dry is never an issue. And this is never an issue because pavers and block come on pallets that are what?? They come on pallets that are wrapped in plastic. You makes use of that plastic wrap :)

    Eventually the paver / block installation has ended. When this happens - the left over materials come off the site. The pallet forks leave. Etc. Etc.

    Last phase is usually grading and turf restoration. At this time all you need is tools and materials pertaining to such.

    Now - lets talk about time for loading and unloading. With an enclosed trailer you're walking back and forth to the front of the property to get things out of the trailer and to put them back in. Each. Day. See - we don't do that, our tools are left neatly in the work area, or neatly tucked away near the work area. I'm huge on keeping the job site tidey. When we do load/unload at the yard (which is at my personal property), i'd bet it's never more than 8 minutes per day. Everything has a system. Just like McDonalds, everything McDonalds does is system driven. I love coming up with ideas for stream-lining things.

    So we're loading tools and taking them back to the yard, and vice versa. It's still less costly than taking the skid steer out to the job Sunday night, and then starting the job Monday morning and hauling the enclosed trailer there. Or, it's still cheaper than starting the job Monday morning and having one truck haul the skid steer and another truck haul the trailer.

    When I was younger I would love to take 2-3 trucks to one job. Knowing what I know now - that was nothing but ego and stupidity. There is never a need to have 3-4 guys on a job with 3 trucks sitting there. Unless you're doing mass production like a tract home builder. And if so - the quality will reflect. Having 3 trucks on a job with 3-4 guys working is nothing other than poor planning. Last Nov we did a demo job in an upscale community in VA, across the street they had some major hardscaping done in the back yard. Every morning I would watch the hardscaper roll in with 4 trucks, one employee per truck. And they would all stay there for the entire day. At the end of the day all four trucks would roll out. Huge waste of fuel. Huge waste of vehicle expense (tires, filters, parts, etc). Huge drain on the profit, even if they were doing very well financially it's money that didn't have to be spent. I wish I took a video of them rolling in.

    Some guys will have a huge profit, so they need to buy equipment for tax purposes. If you're paying cash for the enclosed trailer - then I agree with the enclosed trailer purchase. If you're financing it - and buying it for the tax write off - then I disagree with that move.

    The idea is to make as much profit as you can. This is achieved by maintaining as low fuel consumption as possible. This is achieved by not adding any more labor hours to the day. This is achieved by not racking up a gazillion miles on the trucks. Yeah, you can keep stuff all in the trailer - but it's counter productive by creating the need for multiple trips to the job or by taking multiple trucks to the job.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2014
  10. P.Services

    P.Services LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,322

    I have a pretty darn nice enclosed 20'er set up for landscape installs. Most jobs your on for a week or more so it's not a big deal putting a skid/mini/tractor on site and then the crew brings the enclosed every day.
    I can tell you one thing though, last year before the trailer it was almost a everyday occurrence that we would forget something or have to run to town to buy this or that. Now I havnt had to leave to go get a single tool or supply once. That saves hundreds. I have a list in the trailer of things we need to add so it keeps getting stocked more and more.
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