Uprooted Norway Spruce...

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by lawnkid, Jan 13, 2008.

  1. lawnkid

    lawnkid LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 935

    We had a strong wind storm last week and I've been getting a lot of calls for uprooted pines because of their shallow root base. Customer of mine calls me yesterday and says that the 20 ft pine by the corner of the house upooted and he wants to know if I can put it back up because he's selling the house and it looks bad. The tree is a Norway Spruce and when it uprooted it took about a 4ft diameter and 2ft deep rootball with it. I was gonna put plywood across the lawn and take the skid close to the tree, hook up a comealong, pull it back up and put about 5-6 good stakes tied around the trunk and hope that it'll take root again in the spring because a couple major roots were severed in the uprooting. I told the customer that there's a chance the tree wont make it and he understands and just wants to get it up for appearance purposes but I'm wondering if there's anyhting I can do to give the tree a better chance at surviving. And yes we do carry a commerical applicators license if there's any chemical treatments involved.Thanks.
     
  2. chris638

    chris638 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 149

    Don't even try it. Shouldn't be done just for liability reasons only, but here are some others.
    1.) Won't be able to straighten because of the amount of dirt that was lifted up with the root ball.
    2.) Won't look right period.
    3.) Any potential home buyer is going to recognize the 6 stakes on the tree and wonder why.
    4.) Would probably be cheaper just to remove and re-plant a 5-6' Norway back in the same spot.
     
  3. lawnkid

    lawnkid LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 935

    Tree is back up to prove it can be done. We used one comealong hooked to another tree to get it started. Then we hooked up two more comealongs from different sides. One tied to a tree and the other to my truck in the drive. Got the tree completely straightened out, then we pounded some 6' long fence tees 5' into the ground and tightened some 1/4" cable around the tree and the spikes. Released all the comealongs and chains to test it out and all the lines tighteneed even more and held the tree no problem. Job came out pretty good. 7 spikes in all around the tree to hold it up. Tree ended up being 31' to be exact. Took 3 of us 5 hours today. Definitely not a job for amateurs. Gotta have some experience in tree work and pulley systems. I did however explain that the tree has a good chance at dying next year because the rootball is barely existent and a lot of major roots were ripped when it fell. No problem, whoever owns the house next year if it's not sold yet can pay me to take it down and replace it with another 12' tree. payup
     

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