Valve Flow Control Problem

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by PurpHaze, May 19, 2007.

  1. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    An unusual situation has started to occur on our automatic valves that have been installed at the newest school sites; 3 elementaries and 1 high school. We use Irritrol Century Plus valves and each of these sites are on domestic water with a booster pump added for the field areas. We'll have a zone stop working where the valve stops firing from the clock. You can manually activate it through both the bleeder screw and the solenoid actuator but not electrically. We've found that by remotely activating the valve and then throttling down the flow control handle the valve will then fire as the problem is corrected. It's almost like too much pressure to the valve is prohibiting it from activating until the flow control is adjusted.

    Anyone run into a similar situation with other valves?
     
  2. Does the system have a master valve because I was asked by my local supplier, if I could go look at a system for another contractor that had a similar situation. Valves would not fire from controller but if we fired the master valve via our station master the system would run just fine from the controller. The problem was too much pressure and a pressure regulator was installed and problem solved... Can you disable the booster pump?
     
  3. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    None of our systems use master valves.

    It can be disabled by removing the wire from the controller post but this won't help us in the long run. Without the booster pump the field sprinklers won't run head-to-head. Also, each zone has two valves that fire simultaneously. Although the main line is large enough to handle the total GPM the pressure is just not there. Without the booster pump everything suffers.

    I don't know what the booster pump is set at either. I'm planning on going back out and measuring the head PSI at various locations to see what the final PSI is.
     
  4. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    Thanks for the good info. Do you recall what brand/model the valves were in that system?
     
  5. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,027

    You do know that the higher the supply pressure, the more power you need to fire a solenoid. Maybe you want to contact Toro and inquire about the low-power solenoid they now have.
     
  6. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    The last valve was within 60' of the controller and we always use 14 AWG wire. Doubt if this is the problem on this particular valve but if you'd like I'll go out and measure the volts at the valve. :)

    And as far as contacting Toro... I have better conversations with a wall. That's why we've been phasing out Toro (and their subsidiaries) products. :nono:
     
  7. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,794

    I think the term is that its easier to talk to Rotard than Toro.
     
  8. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    First words out of Toro's mouth is always, "You're doing it all wrong..." :nono:
     
  9. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,794

    "I know, we shouldn't have started with your product"
     
  10. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,027

    To give Toro some credit, it's probably a Hydro-Rain concept they're looking to bring back. With adequate voltage, any solenoid should be getting the usual power, but the force required open the solenoid is a function of supply pressure (and solenoid port diameter) ~ so something there might be behind the mystery.
     

Share This Page