Valves for dirty water

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by ArTurf, Sep 8, 2011.

  1. ArTurf

    ArTurf LawnSite Gold Member
    Male, from Ark
    Posts: 3,436

    I have been working on a golf course that pumps from a pond. The valves that were used in the original install were 1" residential Buckner valves. I have replaced the top end and diaphragm in many of these. Until this point I have not worked on many systems that use dirty water. A few residential but they do not see the abuse a golf course system would. After checking I see valves designed for dirty water and higher pressures cost about 6-7 times more. At this point it would not be practical to replace all the valves. Needless to say but it would be safe to assume there would be less valve issues if the correct type valve would have been used. Not really a question here just sort of a vent and would like to hear from those who work with a lot of dirty water.
     
  2. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,323

    Why is it not practical to replace the valves with Rainbird PEBS scrubber valves, as needed?
     
  3. ArTurf

    ArTurf LawnSite Gold Member
    Male, from Ark
    Posts: 3,436

    Between 200-250 valves @ $80.00 each plus labor time and low to no budget. Just not gonna happen money wise.

    If I have to replace the whole valve and not just the top end do you think it would be worth it to use the right valve?
     
  4. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,323

    Not replace all at once, but if the water is an issue, to the point of a service call being needed, then there is a dollar cost to keeping the original clean-water valves.
     
  5. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    I would agree with replacing with an appropriate valve when faced with a full valve rebuild. The only factor that might stop you from doing this would be if the valve can be removed from the manifold (if it exists) without rebuilding the entire manifold.
     
  6. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,323

    Just curious, exactly what model of Buckner was used?
     
  7. ArTurf

    ArTurf LawnSite Gold Member
    Male, from Ark
    Posts: 3,436

    Can't find an exact model #. It has 4 bolts and was sold to Ewing which they now sell. I have been buying the Ewing valve for about $12 for parts.

    To rebuild the valve takes about 10-15 min. To replace the valve would require digging up the valve box swing joint and head. They are all threaded together. Rough guess, about 1.5 hours.

    Kiril,
    The valves are not in a manifold. If something is broken and has to be dug up I may consider replacing the valve with something more appropriate.

    I am thinking the water intake from pond could be optimized to draw in less debris/silt etc. Will suggest this to them. Can any of you give me suggestions on this?

    Have any of you ever went to a manufacturers school? If you did was it worth it? I am considering attending one over the winter for golf course systems since I think I may end up servicing this system long term.

    A little off subject but this system was converted to electric valves around 1998. If I had been bidding the job I would have used the right valve and naturally my price would have been higher and I would have probably not got the job. Just venting.
     
  8. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,323

    Sounds like they might have done well to keep the hydraulic valves and replace controllers with standard equipment combined with the electric/hydraulic adapters that Toro makes. Normally-open hydraulic valves have no worries with dirty water.
     
  9. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,896

    I attended a lot of those schools/symposiums; some I learned from, others I feel asleep at. :sleeping:
     
  10. stebs

    stebs LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 373

    how do your costs compare between new valves and new valve-in-head irrigation heads?
     

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