Verticutting and Aeration

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by Adam3669, Mar 4, 2007.

  1. Adam3669

    Adam3669 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 311

    Would it be wise to do these two at the same time?

    If so, would I dethatch first, then aerate and put in a fertilizer?

    I have a customer that wants this done relatively soon.

    Thanks a lot guys/gals

    -Adam
     
  2. Dollar Spot

    Dollar Spot LawnSite Member
    Posts: 162

    If you did it in the fall you could add overseeding to that list also. If you have time to let the cores dry you could aerate first and then verticut. This would breakup the cores. If the cores don't dry you'll have a muddy mess on your hands (and feet). The least amount of on site time would be to verticut and then aerate. Either order you do it in has its advantages and disadvantages.
     
  3. Adam3669

    Adam3669 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 311

    Thanks for your reply^

    So where would the fert. come in during this process?

    Would it be beneficial to Aerate, put down the fert., then verticut it to further mix in the fert?
     
  4. Dollar Spot

    Dollar Spot LawnSite Member
    Posts: 162

    I would fertilize last and water it in or let the rain take it down. I would be cautious about fertilizing and then verticutting because your fertilizer coverage may be screwed up.
     
  5. BeautifulBlooms

    BeautifulBlooms LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 613

    I second that about doing the fertilizing last!

    How bad is the lawn that it needs to be thinned out and aerated? I guess if the customer wants it done and the lawn can sustain such a brutal day then it should be fine. I would believe dethatching (or verticutting) is only necessary if there is an excess of thatch. And Aerating is always beneficial, I just am not sure of the outcome of doing both at the same time. Maybe one spring one fall? Is that a possibility?

    Although I am from further North so maybe it is necessary and will work down there.
     
  6. DoetschOutdoor

    DoetschOutdoor LawnSite Bronze Member
    from S. IL
    Posts: 1,818

    I had to dethatch and then aerate and overseed several yards last fall. Got great results since the lawn will be thinned out dramatically and then aerator makes nice contact. IF you are only gonna fertlize and no seed, dethatch first and then aerate and fert.
     
  7. Dollar Spot

    Dollar Spot LawnSite Member
    Posts: 162

    I still like the idea of aerating first and then verticutting if you have time for the cores to dry. The reason is that by verticutting last the cores are spread out over the whole turf area and that means that the micro-organisms that break down thatch are also spread out over the whole turf area. Isn't it all about reducing thatch and it's effects on turf?

    I could tell you some real horror stories about thatch and its effects.
     
  8. Adam3669

    Adam3669 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 311

    Thanks for the reply's guys...i think I'v got an idea of what to do now.

    Here are some pics of the lawn in question:

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  9. DoetschOutdoor

    DoetschOutdoor LawnSite Bronze Member
    from S. IL
    Posts: 1,818

    That front yard def. does not need to be dethatched imo. It just looks really thin and bare in some spots so I wouldnt dethatch judging from the pics. I cant tell about the pics of the back.
     
  10. PSUturf

    PSUturf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 663

    Dollar Spot has given you good recommendations. If you have the time to let the cores dry out you might want to consider using a slit seeder instead of just a verticutter. It will break up the cores and place seed in the soil. Lesco service centers usually rent these machines. From the pictures it looks like they may have been neglecting to fertilize the lawn (one possible reason for its current state). Urge the customer to get on a regular fertility program.
     

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