Volt Meter For Irrigator

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by ed2hess, Dec 9, 2012.

  1. 1idejim

    1idejim LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,340

    No, i am not saying that. Your reading might be right on for the wire/voltage drop/resistance/temp/inrush holding requirements of the system. You use RB valves and 16/18 ga wire?
    As the heat goes up, the resistance goes down.
    5-6 volt amps, depends on the solenoid specs.

    I have a pro-93 LCM and it reads good, i have an excel clamp that i have to wrap the wires. Before i blew my FLUKE 5/600 to the next world i had to wrap the forks to get an accurate measurement.

    I never had any luck with a standard meter connected in series.

    Hope that the above didn't confuse the question
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  2. 1idejim

    1idejim LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,340

    You use a jump wire in series with the common. That gives you the slack for either style of meter.
    All zones are measured via the common.
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  3. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,411

    Again, why disconnect any wires when you don't have to? A proper clamparound saves you that time.
     
  4. 1idejim

    1idejim LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,340

    There should be no guesswork, they either work or they don't.

    With the exception of low voltage lighting guys i prolly use DMMs as much if not more than the average bear and i don't take issue with removable leads or plugin adapters.

    I did recently look at a buddies meter, he thought it was broke. The leads were in the wrong ports.
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  5. 1idejim

    1idejim LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,340

    You always DISCONNECT THE COMMON when measuring resistance at the controller, you silly...

    Testing order is Voltage - Resistance - Amperage
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  6. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,411

    You can get effective resistance readings with all the zone wiring still in place, because the controller triacs won't pass through the minute amount of voltage emanating from an ohmmeter of the modern solid-state variety.

    And it's still worth having a clamparound that leaves all the wiring in place - saves time.
     
  7. 1idejim

    1idejim LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,340

    You always DISCONNECT THE COMMON shoes.

    It is bad juju not to. Since i need the valve and the common free to connect the transmitter to for locating anyway it's just smart.

    I may not fully test every clock but i always follow the same basic proceedure.

    I am sure that with your gazillion thread posts that yov aren't so swamped that you can't loosen 1 screw.

    Sorry shoes, that was mean.

    Btw, most controllers don't have enough room to center the wire.
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  8. 1idejim

    1idejim LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,340

    Let me add this, i only remove the common when performing Voltage - Resistance - Amperage tests. i install the jumper when i remove the common.
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  9. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,411

    There are meters and there are meters. A techie friend showed off an early digital multimeter that was built to be immune to any electrical mistreatment. Set it to resistance and stick the probe ends into a wall socket, you get a reading and no damage done. Test the resistance of the phone line, with its 48 volts when not in use, and get a reading of exactly 600 ohms, just like the phone company wants it to be.


    Of course, that was light years beyond a $2.99 Harbor Freight multimeter that dies if you look at it funny [​IMG]
     
  10. bcg

    bcg LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Tx
    Posts: 1,835

    I'm almost entirely maintenance and repair, installed 5 systems in the last 3 years, so it's whatever is there. Typically it's either RB DV100 or Hunter SRV valves and 18 ga wire.

    Right, got that.

    No, that helps. So my Fluke is reading correctly.

    BTW, I prefer the Greenlee DM20 but killed my last 2. I've got a couple on order with my distributor but for some reason they aren't here yet. The Flukes are great but I do have a few issues with them for the kind of use I have.

    1 - They don't like to measure resistance when there's current on the wire (i.e. POOF). The Greenlee will just beep at you and you can carry on with your day.

    2 - They really aren't rugged enough for this kind of work. As much as they cost, I feel terrible getting them muddy and know they can't handle being wet.

    3 - I prefer a manual ranging resistance setting. I can get it with the Fluke but there are too many steps involved. On the Greenlee, I set it to 200 Ohms and get on with it.

    I don't really care for the little lead clamps, sure its a hassle sometimes but I prefer to just touch the leads to what I'm testing.
     

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