Wall about to blow

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by Humble Earth Mover, Sep 7, 2007.

  1. Humble Earth Mover

    Humble Earth Mover LawnSite Member
    Posts: 167

    This is a wall at one of my customer's houses that was built 5 or 6 years ago. Obviously a lack of drainage combined with daily irrigation led to hydrostatic build up which has this wall ready to bust at the seems. My question is about the tree. I won't be tearing this wall down till spring and will be redoing the walls and walkway in all masonry. The weeping cherry tree is already leaning and leaking huge amounts of sap. Do you guys think it is possible to tear this wall down and rebuild without icing the tree completely? Any advice on supporting the tree through the build process?

    Thanks!

    PS, the guy who built the wall, also built the walkway. Riser is 12"!

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  2. tthomass

    tthomass LawnSite Gold Member
    from N. VA
    Posts: 3,497

    B&B the tree if you must keep it. What about the roots messing with the wall once rebuilt?
     
  3. Humble Earth Mover

    Humble Earth Mover LawnSite Member
    Posts: 167

    I'm not sure about the roots. Do you think they will push apart a steel reinforced masonry wall? The homeowner loves the tree and seems to have put off fixing the wall for fear the tree may die. I want to build the wall at a larger radius, should I completely remove the tree to do this? I have no idea as I've never had a situation like this before. Does anyone else think the tree will be an issue with the integrity of the wall? Would the wall starting to give way cause the tree to stress fracture? I don't know what else would cause all that sap to pour out.
     
  4. forestfireguy

    forestfireguy LawnSite Senior Member
    from nj
    Posts: 601

    You could install root barriers, but I don't know if it's the proper application for the product.
     
  5. tthomass

    tthomass LawnSite Gold Member
    from N. VA
    Posts: 3,497

    Overlooked that, thought you were putting back a block wall.
     
  6. Humble Earth Mover

    Humble Earth Mover LawnSite Member
    Posts: 167

    What is a root barrier? I believe this is a Higan Cherry, which will get pretty huge. If planted in a strong retaining ring, will this contain the tree, or will the tree eventually beat the wall up too much? Like I said, I have no clue.
     
  7. forestfireguy

    forestfireguy LawnSite Senior Member
    from nj
    Posts: 601

    Eventually it will push your wall no matter what you make it out of. I believe masonary would last longer than an SRW but it will eventually fail, eventually might be in like 10-15 yrs though, root barrier is a metal containment product, the cities use them to prevent trees from lifting sidewalks, again I am not sure this is the proper applicatioon.
     
  8. fitzg2md

    fitzg2md LawnSite Member
    Posts: 156

    root barriers are the plastic or metal panels you install around the tree (at as far out as you can) that direct the flow of roots downward instead of out toward the wall. They are used in cities often when trees are planted in those little 3x3 square planters in the concrete sidewalks. Dont know if they can be adapted to be a circle shape, but you could always just install a square within a circle. Whatever you do, increase the size of the ring.
     
  9. Grn Mtn

    Grn Mtn LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 863

    A root barrier can be a fabric that has copper(I think) woven into it that deters root growth, Lesco used to sell one.

    Leave the tree in place, if you are expanding the diameter of the wall then you won't be interfering with the roots that much.

    Anytime you cut roots you should also trim back the canopy, I would also add some superthrive or mroots.

    Root systems are relative in size to the canopy, so If the HO keeps the tree on a regular trimming schedule, the roots should not pose a problem in the future.
     
  10. Grn Mtn

    Grn Mtn LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 863

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