Wall Constuction

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by Cfredo3, May 7, 2007.

  1. Cfredo3

    Cfredo3 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 4

    I have a question. I'm buildig a 15" high paver patio, using EP henry conventry wall pavers for the retaining wall. I started the wall laying 2" layers of gravel mix into a 10 inch trench. My question is two fold.

    1) Accidentally, I did not put down a tarp between the gravel and the subgrade. Is this a big deal? I plan on doing it for the rest of the wall but want to know if this will cause this portion to sink. There is not much clay, if any at all in the dirt, so i think it should be ok. thoughts?

    2) I compacted the wall gravel down in 2" layers using a hand tamp and wetting the gravel slightly each time. I feel like i got a pretty good compaction but I was wondering if it is recommended to use something like a jumping jack. I don't want my wall sinking on me as it is the border of my patio.

    Any help is appreciated.

    Thanks.
     
  2. cgland

    cgland LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,929

    Do a search and you will find a myriad of info on this subject.
    Chris
     
  3. PatriotLandscape

    PatriotLandscape LawnSite Bronze Member
    from MA
    Posts: 1,209

    Yes rent a jumping jack and next time make it large enough to run a compactor in.

    No big deal on the fabric just don;t always do it that way.
     
  4. forestfireguy

    forestfireguy LawnSite Senior Member
    from nj
    Posts: 601

    Agreed this topic is prime for a search. Just curious, and no judgement intended are you a contractor or homeowner?
     
  5. ChampionLS

    ChampionLS LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,066

    Hmmm What are "Coventry Wall Pavers?"
    Did you Mean Coventry Wall or Coventry Pavers? I hope you meant your using a Retaining Wall Block. You don't need Geo textile under the base for the wall, but you will need to line the inside of your patio with it, before back filling with stone. Using a hand tamper is fine for compacting the base under a retaining wall. Your base or leveling pad should extend 4-6" on both sides of the block, and be 6" thick.
     
  6. cgland

    cgland LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,929

    Can you explain your reasoning here?

    Chris
     
  7. Cfredo3

    Cfredo3 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 4

    yes, i'm a homeowner..how could you tell? this is my first project like this. I meant to say coventry wall blocks..not pavers.

    Now, I didn't extend the wall base very far beyond the width of the blocks. Is this going to be a problem? In some cases the footing block is almost flush against the front end of the trench. Let me know what you all think.

    Thanks.
     
  8. forestfireguy

    forestfireguy LawnSite Senior Member
    from nj
    Posts: 601

    Did you bury the first course or at least 10 percent of the total height? How far along are you now, would starting over be a killer? If not you might consider it, actually even if so you might consider it. If you do PM me and I'll help you through it. If not I honestly wouldn't give your wall/patio much in the way of longevity.
     
  9. PatriotLandscape

    PatriotLandscape LawnSite Bronze Member
    from MA
    Posts: 1,209

    I would remove what you have and dig a correct base having the base only the width of the block is really useless and no different then putting it directly in the dirt it will have no lateral stability.
     
  10. ChampionLS

    ChampionLS LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,066

    When you build a retaining wall, you don't use (or need) any geotextile fabric under your base. The base is usually 4-6" wider than the block and is approximately 6" thick. The base can be 2a, or 2b stone (modified or clean) depending on the type of wall and where your using it. (stream, river bank, or a regular gravity wall).

    A retaining wall is interlocked along it's entire linear measurement, and becomes monolithic- evenly pressing down by it's shear weight. adding a little strip of fabric is not going to increase it's stability. In fact- it can have the opposite effect by not allowing water to drain and causing a failure.
     

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