Wall Project

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by DVS Hardscaper, Mar 7, 2012.

  1. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,406

    Hey aztlan!

    Here at the site as I type:) lookin at the wall!

    Looks really good brotha!

    Keep in mind, pics are shot from my phone. At the moment the sun is spot lighting the wall, same as back when the photo was taken. If I hold the phone up and look at the pic, it looks like a black shirt full of lint under a black light. Looking at the pic screen of my phone - the dark colors are really magnified, and the lighter colors are almost washed out. I'm assuming from the full sunlight. When the sun comes around the side, it's a huge dark shadow. Now I have a Minolta camera and if I used that to shot the pics, I'd use a shaded lens to reduce the suns glare.

    And from the highway (250 - 300 yds) away - the wall blends in with the hillside. Now I see why the manufacturer calls the color 'blended earth'! You have to really look to see the wall.

    Thanks for the lecture old buddy old pal :)

    Super Excited to seeing your walls!
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2012
  2. BradLewisLawnCare

    BradLewisLawnCare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 279

    Great progress pictures. really helping people less intelligent figure out how to do it right.
     
  3. JimLewis

    JimLewis LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,835

    I'm less intelligent! :waving:


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  4. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,406

    this is how we *cut corners* while maintaining the original texture on both sides

    cap corner.jpg
     
  5. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,406

    Picture of the 'Drainage Chimney'.

    Now for this particular wall, there will be pavers installed up to the wall's cap. So, after the pavers are installed - it's very unlikely this drainage chimney will ever see a drop of water.

    The chimney is composed of 3/4-inch aggregate, wrapped in filter (geo-textile) fabric. Primarily averaging 18 to 24-inches wide throughout the height of the wall.

    drainage chimney.jpg
     
  6. xtreem3d

    xtreem3d LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 801

    don't know why but i never liked the look of 45* miter cuts on corners
     
  7. zedosix

    zedosix LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,628

    They look nice but any movement and its instantly noticeable. Also its not as solid imo, as just chipping the end of the cap. Notice the small chip in the bottom of the capstone. Not pickin on anyone in particular just an observation.
     
  8. AztlanLC

    AztlanLC LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,035

    I agree I much rather use my guillotine and split the last 2"
     
  9. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,406

    Corners are one of those things where other variables come into play. In terms of my pic, we debated mitering corners or splitting the ends. I wanted to split the ends. But for this situation - splitting ends would have resulted in a sliver being cut for each of the two sides (where the caps meet the steps).

    No two jobs are ever the same :). Situations like this coincide with my comment to the guy from MD who was asking about how long to build a planter earlier this week and I referenced "learning curve" :)

    I'd say 50% of our corners are mitered, 50% are split. Final outcome deriving from variables such as I) if we go this route will it result in a sliver? II) does it flow well? III) etc

    Also, mitering with a table saw, not a hand held saw, results in perfect cuts with no chips.
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    Posted via Mobile Device
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2012
  10. Red Shed Landscaping

    Red Shed Landscaping LawnSite Member
    Posts: 182

    I was wondering about the drainage chimney. When you use geotextile, do you wrap the gravel bringing it to the block or fold over the soil when coming to a grid layer? I was thinking about this and was wondering if the extra fabric will lessen the effectiveness of the grid since some of it is not in contact with the soil or rock below?
     

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