Water flow

Discussion in 'Water Features' started by Niagara Falls, Mar 11, 2010.

  1. Niagara Falls

    Niagara Falls LawnSite Member
    Posts: 149

    I am not 100% sure of the type and size of pump I want for my water fall project, but is there one which has a flow control built in. I am looking at about 12,000gph, but that might be too much based on the various methods of formulation I've seen.
    And that's another area of concern. I have no less than 3 different formulas for the required GPH, that range from 5,500 up to 20,000. All arived at from the same input data.

    Sure not an exact science is it.
     
  2. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    On the contrary, it is an exact science if you use the correct method of determining pump size. If you know the waterfall weir width, the desired flow depth, the height of waterfall weir from pond surface, length of piping, size of piping, and the number of elbows, tees, etc.(if you are using rigid PVC), you can pretty accurately determine the size (GPM or GPH rating) of the pump required. More simply put, you must determine total HEAD. Then you find a pump that will give you the flow you want at that HEAD.
     
  3. Niagara Falls

    Niagara Falls LawnSite Member
    Posts: 149

    That's where I'm probably getting different answers, because of all the extra data I really don't know 100%. I don't know how many elbows or tees I'm going to require until I actually get to the drawings.....if you can call them that. What I have is a picture of where I want the waterfall & pond with rough pencil sketching.
    I guess the best and only way is to measure it all and then re-calculate my pump needs. And that will give me my exact HEAD ??

    As you are aware, I'm not a pro, just very determined to do it myself.
     
  4. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    Looking back over your previous posts, I would recommend using 3" Flex PVC. This will reduce pipe friction loss and completely eliminate any loss from fittings, plus it is easier to install. It is a little pricey but worth the extra costs. There are several Head calculators available for free on the Web. Hint: Use the simplest one, you are not plumbing a high rise.
     
  5. STL Ponds and Waterfalls

    STL Ponds and Waterfalls LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,177

    To add to what Tadpole said. Your better off using flex pvc in your climate, it will withstand freezing a lot better than rigid pvc. If any water gets trapped in the pipe and freezes it will not break like rigid will. 3" flex is pretty big so take that in to account when planning. It's roughly 4.5" OD.
     
  6. tadpole

    tadpole LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,216

    I keep forgetting temps. St. Louis is correct. Flex PVC is some tough stuff, tried to cut it with an axe one time just to see how tough. Almost sprained both wrists with the recoil and only put a scratch in the Flex. You are in Hort zone 4b and I am in zone 8b, that's forty degrees F difference. Need to rethink several things in your temps, like how does silicon caulk and waterfall foam react to extended freezing?
     
  7. alf500series

    alf500series LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 257

    do you know how much pipe you will need? i just did a fountain last fall and have 25' of flexible 3" pvc pipe that id be willing to sell.
     
  8. pitrack

    pitrack LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,049

    He lives in Canada, I doubt it would be worth shipping that pipe all the way there.
     
  9. alf500series

    alf500series LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 257

    you might look into pondusa.com i believe their warehouse is in quebec. thats where i got my pump and flexible tubing
     
  10. JJE

    JJE LawnSite Member
    from MPLS,MN
    Posts: 19

    LMAO .... pondusa. :drinkup:

    Warehouse in Canada:hammerhead::hammerhead::hammerhead::hammerhead: :dizzy::dizzy:

    Gotta love the way things done today:laugh:
     

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