Water Pressure Issues after Winterization

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by lukenki, Dec 7, 2004.

  1. lukenki

    lukenki LawnSite Member
    Posts: 1

    I just had my sprinkler system winterization completed. We have lived in our home for two winters so this is the second time we have had this performed. Both times after the water to the sprinkler system is turned off we have next to no cold water in our basement bathroom. It takes forever for the toilet to fill and there is hardly any cold water that comes out of the sink. What could the problem be and how can I fix it? Before the winterization I told the guy from the lawn service about the issue. He did not think that having the sprinkler system blown out would have any effect but unfortunately it does. Additional facts - our home is 6 years old and the sprinkler system was installed before the basement was finished.
     
  2. Critical Care

    Critical Care LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,654

    Good grief - lets not assume that somehow the irrigation’s “point of connection” was tied into a hot water line! I suppose that with the irrigation being currently off you would now have an abundance of hot water. Not likely… but you never know.

    Another possibility is that perhaps there is a valve in the cold water line going to the basement, and this valve was shut off during or for the winterization process. Perhaps the irrigation system’s point of connection is somewhere on this line. A lot of this is speculation because no two irrigation installs ever seem to be the same – well… almost.

    Finally, if the irrigation’s point of connection is off of the main service line going to the house, I can’t see how at all it would affect water within the house outside of pressure issues.
     
  3. fixer67

    fixer67 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,098

    I tell what I thank has happened here. The sprinkler system was there first then the bathroom , right? Well from that it sounds like the bathroom cold water line was tied into the cold water line feeding the sprinkler system . There valve you use to turn off the sprinkler system is really the valve for the bath room. A second valve needs to be installed between the bathroom and the sprinkler system . The real trick is going to be finding just where and how the hook up was made. The best thing may be just to disconnect the line feeding the sprinkler system and tie it off out side at the house. Then run a new line and valve just for it from some where else. Sometimes it is just easier to redo something and start over than trying to find the problem. I tried to draw a picture of what I am saying.

    Sprinker system.JPG
     
  4. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    fixer67 - if that is what has happened, why would you run a new line for the sprinkler? I'd simply install a new valve for the sprinkler, just past the feed going into the bathroom. 15 min fix.
     
  5. fixer67

    fixer67 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,098

    That would be the nice and quick way but could you find where the tie in was? I have done a great bit of remodeling and most of the time just finding the right place to change the pipes or wires is just too much of a nightmare. It is just easier just to go around it. If the right place can be found you are right. But I am thanking the tie-in is in the walls or somewhere else it can not be seen or gotten to easy or someone would have figured it out before now. And putting the valve out side at the sprinkler system out in the cold I just do not like so at that point I would just tie off the line and bury it to keep it from frezzing. So running a new line around the whole mess and starting over is a better way I thank. If a good place (inside the house) past the bathroom and before the sprinkler system can be found then your way is the best.
     
  6. battags

    battags LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 607

    I agree with your diagnosis but this part won't work. Valve outside the house? Maybe in NC but this guy lives in Kansas. I'm not exactly sure what the seasonal weather temps are like in KS but any outside water line would freeze in my area of Ohio unless it was 3' deep. Three feet is a little deep to be placing an additional valve.

    I'm leaning toward Grassmechanics solution. Even if it is a finished basement, I think it would be easier to knock a few holes in drywall to find the tie-in than the remedy you propose. JMHO.

    Brian
     
  7. fixer67

    fixer67 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,098

    You need to re-read my post. I said I do not like valves out side the house. I said if I had to run a new line I would dig up and tie off and bury the to keep it from freezing. I said to find a good place inside the house top put the valve. Please re-read my post and you will see
     
  8. battags

    battags LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 607


    I quoted your first one and missed it in your second. Sorry.

    Brian
     
  9. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    fixer, I wasn't trying to diss you, but the guy said he had a basement. Most plumbing in basements are exposed and easy to get at. I also agree that a shut-off should remain indoors, along with an appropriate drain, where it is less likely to freeze.
     
  10. Critical Care

    Critical Care LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,654

    In this area we have one of the shortest growing seasons around, and even in the summer freezing temps can occur. Except for the very old turn of the century installs, most valves and backflow devices are located outside within valve boxes - typically with a bit of insulation material over them. No need to bury them three feet down. And of course, most people blow out their systems before the hard freeze hits at the end of the season.

    Any remedy we offer lukenki of course means nothing until he finds the problem. It could be a very simple fix, or perhaps could require running a new line. We don't know. I'd like to hear if he's found anything... such as a valve on the cold water line going to the basement being turned off.
     

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