Watering with sprinklers and garden hose

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by 1999frontier, Apr 10, 2013.

  1. 1999frontier

    1999frontier LawnSite Senior Member
    from NC
    Posts: 562

    I've been watering my yard using a rain bird 42sa rotary or the rain bird P5R impact. I've been switching between the two (still don't know which one does the better job. I've just had two on opposite sides of the yard watering 180 degrees. I've got 2 100' 5/8" hoses that I've been using. I'm wondering since the sprinklers aren't 100' away from the sprinkler should I use a smaller length hose especially if I decide to buy more sprinklers and run multiple at a time.

    Would buying a hose and cutting it down so I don't have a lot of excess be better, or it really doesn't matter?
     
  2. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    Experimentation is the only way to figure out what will work best for your lawn, soil type, timing according to lifestyle, etc...
    once the soil has moisture 4-6 inches deep let it dry out, then do it again... :)
     
  3. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,308

    My suggestion, stop wasting your money on inefficient stop gap solutions, bite the bullet and install a real irrigation system.

    And yes, it does matter how much hose there is.
     
  4. 1999frontier

    1999frontier LawnSite Senior Member
    from NC
    Posts: 562

    I'm not sure how much an inground irrigation system cost but I would guess $3,000-$5,000 for my front yard which is roughly 3,224 sq ft. (62'x52'). I was thinking about finding a couple 25' hoses and connecting 3 sprinklers in a line and using 9 sprinklers all together to water.
     
  5. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    21 yards(paces) X17yds... Seems like you should find a 90' diameter sprinkler that will cover the whole area in one shot... They are hard to find and you may not have the pressure...
    Otherwise,,, It depends on your environment, but generally with decent soil, a bit of shade here and there, letting it grow longer in the summer heat, even stop mowing altogether, and fertilizing at the correct times, you should get by just fine... I soak various places during the course of the week just to supplement the rain enough to keep the grass green and alive... some clients do have irrigation either and I'm full maintenance for that entire neighborhood so I know it can easily be done,,, even in sections...
    Just don't overdo it... :)

    I almost hate the idea of some people having irrigation becuz they turn the soil into compacted muck covered by a dusty layer of living thatch... Watered every morning, dusty by noon with silly putty underneath... interesting how that happens...
     

Share This Page