Websites Anyone?

Discussion in 'Digital Marketing' started by Lawn Boy, May 24, 2005.

  1. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    Please note Content rated Mature:

    (been working on that since 1.sep.2000, is more than meets the eye, 400+ pages, literally gigs of files) ...

    Originally WAS supposed to be a way to earn a living, but the site pays for the server today and I'm cool with that, I do it mostly for fun now (which is how I got it to earn anything in the first place, go figure).
  2. cgland

    cgland LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,929

  3. centralarlawn

    centralarlawn LawnSite Member
    Posts: 44

    Mine is

    I just started it, and do not have much on there yet, but it is coming along nicely i think.

    let me know what you think.
  4. ESI

    ESI LawnSite Member
    Posts: 0

    We do web design ( and one of our very first projects involved a businessman who was in the landscaping and lawn care business. I'll tell you what I told him, but you can get the information for nothing.

    If you decide that you want to make a website, you can do it yourself and you can do it cheap - or you can hire a professional. The important question you should ask yourself is "What do I expect my website to deliver?" Hopefully, you know the right answer - "business". Whether you do it yourself or hire someone, "results" needs to be the yardstick by which you measure your success.

    If a customer is looking for a lawn care specialist, they may use Superpages, the Yellow Pages, Google or any number of ways to find local providers of lawn service. When they happen to access your site they will make a decision in less than 10 seconds whether to read more and possibly call, or click on the next link. The ONLY thing that separates your small business from a multi-million dollar landscaping company at that moment is the impression that your web site will make on the potential customer. If your website is unorganized, cluttered and weak - then that is the subconscious impression that you will impart on the customer. If you cannot impress a customer with the attractiveness of your site, then you will most likely not have good results at building new customers.

    Here are a few hints.

    > Your Home Page should define your site!!! When someone makes the click, they should immediately know who you are and what you do.
    > Keep is Simple - Too much detail creates chaos. No more that 4-6 different subject classes on the front page and it should be a balanced mix of text and images.
    > Symmetry - You page should remain stable and the menus should always be in the same place - not jumping around with every click. Different browsers should display it the same way, at every magnification.
    > Attractive Functionality- Don't plop down graphics and add a bunch of Java applets which hop and crawl all over your page. Everything must serve a purpose and should always either ask or answer a question. Clutter and confusion destroys the message.
    > Finally "psychology". There is a method and reason for putting images of people who are attractive, happy and satisfied within your site. It is to make the connection between your service and satisfaction. It isn't dishonest or distortion - it is sales! You have got to give the customer a reason to call you.

    Then, once you get the job, if you are as good as your website implies, then you will keep the customer. No website will make up for poor customer service. But you know that - right?

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