Weed pulling job bid ?

Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by boxoffire, Oct 9, 2004.

  1. boxoffire

    boxoffire LawnSite Member
    Posts: 169

    Got a lady who wants me to come by and look at her 2 flower beds and pull some weeds out along with some ivy. Not poison ivy she said. Anyway I wanted to just tell her over the phone I'd do it and charge this much an hour but she wants be to come by first. So I will tomorrow. The only way to really get them out best and do a good job is sit on your rump and pull'em I guess, so what's a good rate for doing this? $30 an hour enough ya think? I am new and need the money but it is about 25 miles from my house.

    Thanks for suggestions.

    Adam
     
  2. Kelly's Landscaping

    Kelly's Landscaping LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,414

    Feel the job out first I run in to many that think since it's only weeding they should not have to pay much for it. I had one tell me if she knew that was all I was going to do for 100 dollars she would have had her husband do it. Well the price was 300 after she haggled with me for 6 weeks I agreed to 100 as a cap but she thought I was actually going to do the complete job I originally quoted for nothing.
     
  3. hosejockey2002

    hosejockey2002 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,195

    Hourly is the way to go on work like this. It's really to get your arse kicked on weeding and cleanup. Only you can answer for yourself whether $30 an hour is enough for you, especially if it's a 50 mile round trip. I get $40-45 for the same work, and only do it if it's close by. If customers think that your hourly rate is too high, they need to be reminded that you are not just simple labor. You show up with your own tools (at least I hope so), and you will work much faster and better than the customer would if he or she did the job themselves. I had a customer who tackled an overgrown bed herself. She worked at it for almost 2 hours and finished about 15 square feet. I finished the remaining 200 square feet in 2 1/2 hours and she happily paid me $120 plus $50 to haul the debris away. Don't get trapped by the old adage "I may be losing money on every job, but I'll make up for it in volume". If it's not profitable, don't do it.
     
  4. boxoffire

    boxoffire LawnSite Member
    Posts: 169

    Ok, thanks folks for responding. I kinda get the idea. I do need the work bu since it's so far I am going to go for $35 an hour, after I get a "feel" for it as Kelly's suggested. I have a work order form made up that outlines what the customer wants from me and I will write the rate in my comments section and have them sign it at the bottom with agreement to pay me in a timely manner upon completion of all work. If she doesn't want it, then I'll let it go. As far as tools go, what should I bring. I mean you really have to actually pull this stuff from the roots to do it right, right? I mean I have work gloves and a hoe, weedeater if I can use it to avoid any plants, some small tines, let's see a hose to dampen it first to soften the ground a little, bags to put the debris in. What else would be helpful in this type of job. I also have a shovel and rake. Oh and I'll continuely work but I don't know how fast I can do it. I mean I don't have to run around killing myself do I? I don't think I could finish 200 sq. feet in 2 1/2 hours as you stated. Maybe they won't like it later if that were to take me 4 hours say. Sorry, I'm totally new and just wondering what I can expect possibly from a customer who might want more out of my services for their money.

    Thanks.
     
  5. HOOLIE

    HOOLIE LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,981

    I like to give a fixed price whenever possible. A lot of customers balk at a per hour charge since its open-ended, and if they haven't done business with you before, they don't know how you work. But if you're really unsure, just give them an hourly rate. I just did a weed-pulling job for a new mowing customer, $200 for all his beds. Only took me 2.5 hours. Thought it would take longer than that. As long as he's happy, that's all that matters.
     

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