Weed whacker Facts

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by lubricity, Jul 9, 2008.

  1. lubricity

    lubricity LawnSite Member
    Posts: 125

    Which models are you using? How long are they lasting? I would like to hear from you guys that actually run them more than about an hour a day.
    We do a super job maintaning all our equipment and use synthetic 2 stroke oil. And still usually only get a year out of an Echo 260.
    We may have these machines run 4-5 hours a day.
    Just tried a Shindawia. 8 months life, took it back under warrentee. Dealer said it was "OVERHEATED", voided warrenttee, and wants to charge to look at it.
     
  2. mike r

    mike r LawnSite Member
    Posts: 143

    Lubricity,
    i run stihls, and must say having very good luck with these, we too run avarage 2-3 hours daily, and no problems, biggest problem here is the throttle speed of these tools,
    especially when cutting non stop per property,if i were you try not to throttle so full with the trigger, back off a little on it, also when or after you had a long open run with the throttle, let the engine idle 1 minute, before you turn it off. i must say learned this the hard way on a back pack blower i had. so i did what i suggested to you and no more
    problems.

    hope this helps. good luck.

    mike.
     
  3. Phil G

    Phil G LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 843

    I maintain equipment for a number of gardens contractor and most of them use the Kawasaki KBL23-A. These guys run them for many hours a day and I rarely have any maintenance problems with them, The guys who use the Stihl are always in the workshop.
    As stated above, do let the machine idle for a short while to let it cool before switching it off.
    Check your local dealer and try the Kawasaki. The downside of the Kawasaki's is I don't make much money from them as they don't come in for repair to often. ;)


    =
     
  4. lubricity

    lubricity LawnSite Member
    Posts: 125

    thanks for the info
     
  5. AAELI

    AAELI LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 362

    I have been cutting with brushcutters since 1970. I have used Shindaiwa, Robin and Maruyama trimmers / brushcutters during this time and routinely get 1000 to 2000 hours of ue before using for scrap or spare odds and ends. We run them 6-8 hours per day for 5-6 days a week all year round here on Guam. The units are punished severely yet hold up with the right mix and line lengths for the jobs they do. Most of the ones used out here professionally are these three brands. Most commercial operators use .130" or .155" line on fixed line heads. The models used are 40cc+.

    Your experience with the machines leads me to ask what rpm you were running at with what mix. Slower running, less than 60% of max rpm, when under a load will cook most oils on the piston and cylinder to a brown glue that really slows and then stops the machine. Failing to keep aircooled engines cooled by the slow fan speed at low rpms will overheat the units.

    My guys used to adjust the high speed air screws on the Shindaiwa carbs to get max rpm at wide open throttle... only when they had to pay for siezed engines run lean did they learn not to mess with them. Air filters clogged up made the units run rich and the guys would rather lean the carb out then take the time to clean the filters.

    Why you seem to get so few operating hours from you units could be related to the user practices of operating and maintenance. Rarely do you find warranty problems after three months of commercial useage. Failures do need to be examined by a competent mechanic to determine cause of the failure.

    AAELI
    Guam
    Where your day is used by us first!
     
  6. Gage7

    Gage7 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 22

    Stihl FS90 and FS130r's We used them from 7am to 7pm 3 days a week. I have the same ones I have had for three years. I change air filters once a month and use Stihl fuel mix.
     
  7. nosparkplugs

    nosparkplugs LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,445

    Tried Shindy, Redmax,and Stihl, all models loss power over time, overheated, and or seized up. We use only Stihl FS250R's with great success worth the extra cost, and I use AMSOIL Saber 2-stroke lubricant.
     
  8. Breezmeister

    Breezmeister LawnSite Bronze Member
    Male, from South Jersey
    Posts: 1,572



    Part of the problem is that you are using what is really a homeowners model, go up in CC to over 30 to 40 CC range and see what a difference that will make.
    Yes, they do cost more, but they will last longer.
     
  9. BostonBull

    BostonBull LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 520

    Like was said you are running a homewoner model. try getting into a 200-300 dollar por model and see the difference. Stihl FS90/110/130 are awesome bullet proof machines.

    Keep a fresh plug in them, dont run the oil too rich, and dont let them idle for too long. Maybe a minute at most. the biggest problem I have seen is the string run too long. The guards have cutters in them for a reason. 4" of extra string drops the RPM's by almost 1000, and heats up the engine an extra 300 degrees! I know many are guilty of running long string, but its easily the worst thing you can do to these machines.
     
  10. mowermankevin

    mowermankevin LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 270

    Lubricity, as you have read from some of the previous posts, maitennance and keeping the guards(not letting the string get too long) is essential to long life. All of the machines that come in here are tired, worn out in the Texas heat from being abused,(no air filter cleaning, run dirty, thrown in the truck after using), all the stuff hot tired guys don't want to mess with, if we get 2 years out of a weedeater before it loses compression,that's about average, I still have an 'ol Green Machine (12/15 years) 3200 still out in the field working everyday, but it sounds like a Harley when you start it up, and is a heavy dog to carry all day, there is no substitute for cc's but your guys might complain about the added weight.
     

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