Weeds In Beds

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by BRIAN GALLO, Sep 27, 2001.

  1. BRIAN GALLO

    BRIAN GALLO LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 282

    I need some advice on weed control in beds. I have a customer that along with lawn care I manage their shrub beds. I put down 8” of mulch and still every week there’s a ton of weeds (broadleaf & grassy) growing everywhere. I spray Round-up every week and I swear for every weed I kill, 3 new ones come up around it! I’m spending way too much time on these beds and I can’t be pulling all the weeds by hand. Any suggestions?

    B’s Lawn Service
     
  2. strickdad

    strickdad LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 544

    one word; preemergent
     
  3. Evan528

    Evan528 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,144

    8 inches of mulch?:eek: are the shrubs alive?
     
  4. Guido

    Guido LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,085

    8" of mulch is way too much man!!

    Did you do that all at once?? Anyway, like someone else said, if you put down some pre-emergent it should stop most of the weed growth.

    Before you re-mulch those beds again, take some of the old stuff out because its probobly decomposing and giving the weeds excellent moist material to grow in.

    Hope this helps!
     
  5. LoneStarLawn

    LoneStarLawn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,415

    <b>Moved thread since pesticides will most likely be the answer to the problem.</b>
     
  6. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    Next Spring, purchase a product called Snapshot. This needs to be done in EARLY Spring, like when the grass is just coming out of dormancy and nothing else of weeds have begun to germinate yet. This will save you hours upon hours of work.;)
     
  7. I believe the most mulch you can get by with is like 3 or 4 inches. 8 inches of mulch is doing more bad than good. Remove imediatley, this will do a lot of harm to the plants. Also, have you tried preen ever? As well as, when you cut the grass, do you make sure to avoid throwing clippings in the beds?
     
  8. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,957

    I.P.M. applys to weed control also. 8" of mulch might not be to much. Mulch blocks sunlight and therefore works as cultural practice to inhibit seed germination. Let us consider the type of mulch and its texture, and stage of decomposition, field capacity, rizosphere, sub soil, drainage, and amount of irrigation. Fine mulch traps seeds near the surface and sunlight can get to them, if the mulch is too moist then we have a perfect enviroment for weed growth. Type of mulch also determine field capacity(how wet). Composition of rizoshere(top 8-12" of soil) and subsoil deternmines field capacity and drainage. Decomposition of mulch also effects field capacity as well as nitrogen consumsion. 8" of fresh mulch is more than likely too much. 3-4" fresh mulch top dressed over 4-5" of decomposited mulch might not be too much.
    Clay and sandy soil need the S.O.M.(soil organic matter)

    Bottom line you might have a water problem.

    Chemicals should be the last thing not the first thing we do.
     
  9. rob m

    rob m LawnSite Member
    Posts: 11

    Snapshot pre-emergent was mentioned for use next spring. Can this be applied over existing mulch or should it be put down before remulching?
     
  10. fireball

    fireball LawnSite Member
    from ne Pa
    Posts: 172

    I agree that you have to use pre-emergents in the spring. But I also use the pre-emergent with my roundup in a tank mix. You can use Surflan, Pendulum, pennant, betasan or Dimension to name a few. Always know what the weeds are, the plant material, and read the label.

    I treat with several different pre-emergents in March depending on the bed. I use Treflan, Snapshot, Ronstar, Surflan, Pre-M, Dimension, Barricade. In rare occasions I have used Casaron in January to control Thistle and morning glory vines.

    I then use a combination of Reward, Roundup, and Dimension as a followup spray for the rest of the year for any breakthroughs or failures of spring treatments.

    My costs for a Treflan treatment are 2.18 per thousand sq ft which is the cheapest. Casaron treatment is the most expensive at 14.46 per thousand sq. ft. These are material costs only
     

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