What about Soil Microbes?

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by Smallaxe, Mar 15, 2009.

  1. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

     
  2. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    Just stand back so that the germinating grass doesn't hit you in the eye it will grow so fast, try it on a small scale around the maintenance building

    On the brown green question, I doubt seriously it was the microbes as they are pretty dormant with soil temps under 50 degrees, probably dried out like you said.

    If you can mix 5% to 10% compost or worm castings to your sand mix you will be amazed how you can cut back on watering and ferts. I know, organic matter is a bad word in sand based turf, it is something you should play with though.
     
  3. bicmudpuppy

    bicmudpuppy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,781

    First, my soil temps are reaching above that magic 55 degree mark. Even after the colder temps and getting the water on 100%, I'm still above 55 at 2+". The one inch temps can be a bit below 55 on a frosty day, but are getting well above 60 in the late afternoons. I didn't take a good close up of the brown in the picture, but I cut a 1" plug and when I cut it down to the crowns, I found live tissues. In the last week, the brown area has gone from about 50% brown in the affected areas to just a bit over 10%. By the time I aerify monday, I doubt I will notice. I did skip fert and molasses this week. I will use the last of the synthetic from last year a week from Monday. I plan to apply something close to 20#'s of Milorganite/m before sanding the aerification holes.

    My compost isn't even close to ready yet, and I don't have a good way to screen it yet. Getting the irrigation up and running with the repairs means that I sort of neglected my compost piles. I watered them today, and the water was COLD, but the pile temps started to rise immediately with the addition of moisture. I even chased the hose down the temp probe and I couldn't make the temp fall below the original, before moisture, temp. Piles were cooled down to below 90 degrees (mid morning air temp was 58 with an overnight low of 38), but moisture brought the piles up to 100 degrees almost immediately. After we get done aerifiying this week, I will turn them. This will be the first turn that I count. The three piles were originally one pile that wouldn't stay wet and I only let stand for about a week. I added horse manure, watered, and rebuilt the pile into three smaller piles I hope I can manage better.

    Going to get back to working on the brewer after next week is over too. The blower I picked up looks like it should do something close to 50" of H20 for pressure and I think the 40" I will ask of it will leave it room to push about 50 CFM. I have to rig a DC circuit for the speed control board.
     

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