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What aerator pulls more plugs per sq foot?

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by Exact Rototilling, May 3, 2008.

  1. Exact Rototilling

    Exact Rototilling LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,362

    I think the Plugr 800 & 850 have the densest pattern. Any others that beat this?

  2. Exact Rototilling

    Exact Rototilling LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,362

    No input on this? Just a bit surprised.

    Ok how about this - how many plug per sq foot does a Ryan 28 pull?

  3. RonB

    RonB LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 429

    From the pic looks like the Plugr lays eggs. The pattern on my BB742 is 3.6" x 6.8".
  4. turfcobob

    turfcobob LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 878

    They all plug holes but at a different rate of speed and a different cost per hole. Piston type aerators put in more holes per foot but at a cost. Rolling units all do between 6 and 9 holes per foot ( all of them) The key is you want 9 to 12 holes per foot for home lawns. Rolling units are much faster and can go across a lawn more times in less time thus more holes. They do this at very little cost due to the design. The rolling units also tend to fracture the soil making the hole more effective. they each have a place and purpose. I helped develop both the la 28 and a number of rolling units. I would use a rolling unit any day over a recip. Less cost to operate and longer service life by far.
  5. larryinalabama

    larryinalabama LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 16,987

    I like my Bluebird, it leaves enough hole in one pass, however a 2 lawns and Im worn out, I think a crankshaft type machine would be less tiring.
  6. turfcobob

    turfcobob LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 878

    I would question a one pass aeration with a rolling aerator. They only give 6 to 9 holes per sq ft. That is all of them. We tried to make a one pass rolling aerator a few years back and could not get enough weight to push 12 tines per sq ft into the ground. So we are stuck with 6 to 9. Thus the double pass aeration for enough holes.
  7. grassman177

    grassman177 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,795

    turfco bob to the rescue!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  8. Exact Rototilling

    Exact Rototilling LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,362

    My Plugr 850, depending on soil type & consistency, can be slowed down to tighten the fore & aft patter to around 6" sometimes less. The Hydro drive even with out the sulky is a major plus - it really helps to control the unit. If the Hydro drive is full forward the plugs holes fore & aft will drift to more than 8" and the tine guide block will drift back and the holes will not be as deep. This is what I do when I run into a patch of extremely rocky soil. It helps lessen to blow to the machine and me. The tine guide block is visible from one of the control cable access hole.

    Running the Plugr 850 is a bit tougher than a 21" mower but from what I've seen and heard must be waaay easier on the body than most rolling tine units. I can run this unit all day and it's not a problem. Rocky soil does beat up the hands though.

    Works well for me.
  9. Terraformer

    Terraformer LawnSite Member
    Posts: 184

    My Ryan la28 consistently pulls 9-12 plugs per sq. ft.. I only use it for aerating the most compacted areas such heavily paths, or wherever I can get my 60" Aera-Vater into. That said, I would much rather ride my Grasshopper with the Aera-Vator attached, because of it's speed and versatility. Example: I just did 75,000 sq. ft. in less than 2 hours and never broke a sweat. It's a sweet setup!
  10. Exact Rototilling

    Exact Rototilling LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,362


    Can you explain the soil fracturing concept in more detail?

    As a side note every aeration done by all the big companies in my area is done with a single pass rolling tine unit. More holes with less fracturing would seem to yield a greater benefit IMO.

    Also several of my aeration customers have said they like to have aerations done during the heat of the summer to help out with dry spots. They claim it cures dry spots?

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