What causes green marks in bermuda going dormant?

Discussion in 'Fertilizer Application' started by DeepGreenLawn, Oct 29, 2009.

  1. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    I am seeing it again this year and still don't know the cause. Driving down the road with all the bermuda lawns around here you see a lot that have green squigly marks through out. Like you would see clippings waved through the yard after a heavy rain. It is only on synthetically treated yards. I treat with both synthetics and organics. My yard is 100% organic as is my parents and it does not have this effect. However, my neighbors yard, which I treat with synthetics, is getting this same effect.

    My wife thinks it is cool, it bugs me to no end and it is obviously not natural.

    Any thoughts? I know it has something to do with nutrient uptake but anyone know the true cause going on underneath?
     
  2. jnrogers

    jnrogers LawnSite Member
    from East TN
    Posts: 219

    Looks kinda like tiger stripes. The golf course were my parents live is like that and I have a couple of my yards that are doing the same thing. The yards I have that are like that have not been fertilized(cheap people) so I dont know if it is a fert problem or not.
     
  3. ted putnam

    ted putnam LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,533

    I don't think it has anything to do with fert vs. no fert or sythetic vs organic. It has to do with what variety of bermuda you have and it's exposure to early frost. I have noticed that common bermudas don't seem to do this while some varities of improved bermuda show it more than others. Frost is settling in pockets that are lower in the turf. These pockets show tip burn from frost first and until a heavy frost comes the result is a "leopard" pattern. I don't think it has anything to do with cultural practices.
     
  4. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    Nice Ted, I didn't even think of that... however, I mainly see it in fertilized lawns, or lawns that are in generally better shape compared to others. I have not seen this in my organic lawns which was what drove me to think of the fert issues.

    By the way, we did have a one day frost not too long ago.
     
  5. ted putnam

    ted putnam LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,533

    My neighbor next door has a huge lawn 1+ acre. there's about 9-10k right around the house that was sodded with improved bermuda when the house was built. The rest of his lawn is common bermuda. It's not really that noticeable when actively growing. We had a frost about 2 wks ago. The areas that were originally sodded now have the "leopard pattern" while the rest of the lawn does not. In the past, I've been called for service calls on this for everything from "worms" in the lawn to "I think you sprayed to heavy last time you were here and now there are dead spots everywhere".:hammerhead::laugh:
     
  6. KES

    KES LawnSite Member
    Posts: 95

    Ted is right it is from the frost. If it was light outside I would snap a few pictures of my yard. I have about 15000 sq ft of Bermuda sod. In the open areas I have frost "stripes" in some areas and it stops around the house. Three yards down from me no stripes. There are 100 homes in my neighborhood and probably 60 are frost striped while others are not.

    Ted every year I get the same phone calls about how I killed the yard or something is killing my yard.
     
  7. whoopassonthebluegrass

    whoopassonthebluegrass LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,213

    This is what newsletters are for!!!! Educate your peeps and keep 'em from nagging you for stupid reasons!
     
  8. KES

    KES LawnSite Member
    Posts: 95

    I do send out newsletters, but it never fails. Usually I talk to the person who does not get the mail. So the husband may see the letter, read it and know what is going on. Then the wife looks out and sees the yard and calls worried.
     
  9. ted putnam

    ted putnam LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,533

    While I'm at it should I include in the newsletter that those little dark weeds that are covering their entire lawn in the Spring are not weeds but the seed tops of their zoysia and or their bermuda.:hammerhead::laugh:I've gotten a few of those calls over the years too. Come on Whoop, a handful (literally a handful, 4-5 people) are "dumb as dirt". Most people have a little common sense. I send a newsletter out once a year with my renewal letter. Much more than that would be a small fortune for me. I address issues such as watering, mowing height, the benefits of mulching instead of bagging, etc... Honestly, I don't put every off the wall thing I've ever been called for in the letter. I can usually handle it over the phone with a brief description by the customer. There may be 1-2 that are so inept that they can't even give me a brief description of what they see. Then I have to make a trip out to their lawn. Not too bad really, considering I have a few hundred customers. Besides, I stress to my customers that they are paying for service, knowledge and expertise...not just someone to spread fertilizer.This what separates me from the 20 yr old "Techs" that look like this;) if you ask them a question.
     

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