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What do you guys consider full service lawn care?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by triadncman, Mar 16, 2003.

  1. triadncman

    triadncman LawnSite Member
    Posts: 72

    just mowing, trimming,edging & blowing off? Just wondering if its more a normal practice to include things like fertilizing, seeding, aerating, leaf removal ect. or do you quote these things seperately when they occur. Im just starting out and have an appointment tommorrow to look at my first property. Years of expirience doing the work just don't know a thing about quoting the jobs. Any help at all would be greatly appreciated.

  2. Shuter

    Shuter LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,171

    I consider my company a full-service property management company. I offer everything that you have stated plus light and heavy equipment work. I have subs that do jobs for me as needed, but the work is through my company, such as tree work that requires a bucket, pavement maintenance, tree spraying, and so on. I also have subs available for carpentry, painting, plumbing, and electrical.

    I also manage a number of summer homes for wealthy people who can't seem to handle taking care of their property. This adds extra income.

    Don't forget about snow work, if you get snow.
  3. greenman

    greenman LawnSite Addict
    Posts: 1,405

    To me, just mowing ,trimming,etc. is not full service. I offer full service property management. Anything and everything that needs to be done or can be done, either my company can do it, or someone will do it through me. That's full service.
  4. TotalCareSolutions

    TotalCareSolutions LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 518

    for us:
    Fertilizer / Spraying (2x year)
    Mowing / Trim
    Pruning 10' or less (as need)
    Weed Control (as need)
    Parking Sweeps
    Softscaping & Mulch extra based on quantity used

    1 Aeration
    Gutters (2x year)
    All above
  5. Darryl G

    Darryl G LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,035

    I agree with the above on what full service is, except for the gutter cleaning part. I don't think that's grounds care because it has to do with the building. Not trying to start an arguement though, just my opinion (and that of my insurance company)

    I'm still trying to add services because I can't even fertilize (no applicators license and no sub for it). I think full service is the way to go...don't make the customer have to find someone else -who may also do what you do.
  6. Fvstringpicker

    Fvstringpicker LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,603

    Mowing, trimming,edging, pruning, fertilizing, and vegitation control. Light landscaping and drainage.
  7. triadncman

    triadncman LawnSite Member
    Posts: 72

    i appriciate the replies. I am merely trying to determine if I need to offer more and if so how to include it in my annual contracts. I had a lawn service at my home previously and it was an annual contract but it was pretty much just mow,edge,trim,blow he didnt even pull weeds. He did fertilize twice a year, but aerating, and seeding were seperate. Im just trying to get opinions on the best way to proceed. Since I first posted I got my second call from an apartment complex who wants me to come by tomorrow and look at it. He wants monthly lawn service and re edge beds with new pine needles. These are my first 2 calls so im a little skiddish about attempting to quote the jobs. like i said before plenty of expirience doing the work, thats why I decided to leave the 9-5 and go into this, but just never been involved with pricing jobs

    Thanks for the help
  8. KLMlawn

    KLMlawn LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 443

    Whether or not you include certain items in a contract does not a full service company make ... it is the total scope of services available.
    Just because you do not include aeration, seeding, gutters, whatever ... in the contract, doesn't mean you are not full service.
    Full service, in my opinion, would include the perfunctory ...
    -Mowing, edging, trim, blow, etc.
    -Fertilizing for lawn and weed control to all hard and softscape areas
    -Hedge trimming and pruning (say up to 12-14')
    -Light to moderate planting/ hardscape installation
    -Topsoil/Mulch delivery and installation
    -Seeding and Sod
    -Aeration, dethatching, renovation, etc.
    -Spring and Fall cleanups
    -Snow plowing/removal and ice management services

    Other things could include ...

    Parking area sweeping and maintenance
    Grading and excavation
    Sprinklers and irrigation services
    Tree work and stump grinding
    Tree spraying and deep root feeding
    Major design and hardscape installation
    Driveways, belgian block, interlock pavers, retaining walls

    Even if you do not offer every service mentioned, and I am sure I missed a bunch, as long as you offer say 7 or 8 of the first 9, you can be considered Full Service, but if you don't ... and you know someone who does and you can sub the job out to them and you still handle and deal with the customer, then "to the customer" you are full service and the "GO TO GUY" they really need.
  9. MOW ED

    MOW ED LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,028

    For "Full Service LAWN Care" I would think that any service related to the LAWN should be available to the customer.
    Mow, trim, edge, fert, spray, dethatch, renovate, aerate, leaf clean, spring clean, are all things to do to the lawn that customers will ask for. Its up to you as to how many services you will include in a package but everyone doesn't need all the services. You should however, be ready to do any service related to the lawn should they ask.

    Now the "Full Service MANAGEMENT Company" is an entirely different story. All the above and then the extras that have to do with the property. That is a league beyond me but I am sure there are a few out here that can help.
  10. fblandscape

    fblandscape Banned
    Posts: 776

    I don't know about the whole idea of full service. I am becoming a bigger and bigger believer in the 80/20 rule.
    That says that 80% of the work will go to 20% of the companies. The remaining 20% of the work will go to the other 80% of the companies.
    The way you become a 20%'er is by servicing a specific market, and doing it REALLY well. Don't try to be everything, to everyone. Find out what you are good at, and learn as much about that as you possibly can. If you are really good at doing fertilization, then that's what you should be doing... not excavating. If you are really good at trimming shrubs, then that's what you should be doing... not cutting grass.

    I hope that makes sense.

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