What is wrong with this picture...

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by KenH, Aug 10, 2003.

  1. KenH

    KenH LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,622

    Sorry for putting this in the lawn care forum, I thought it deserved to be seen. This first picture is from an actual approved planted drawing. It shows the detail of a rootball being ripped in half, then planted on top of a ground stump. Lets hear all the things which could go wrong. Mind you...this is a 'professional' drawing.

    tree1.jpg
     
  2. Movinfr8

    Movinfr8 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 178

    I know NOTHING about the subject, but.....
    That don't look right!
    Norm
     
  3. bobbygedd

    bobbygedd LawnSite Fanatic
    from NJ
    Posts: 10,178

    ok, please tell us, the suspense is killing me. other than the stump rotting, and causing the new tree to sink, and the fact that the new tree is already planted too deep, i dont know. we r waiting........
     
  4. KenH

    KenH LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,622

    Wow Bobby, Im surprised at you....;) , Splitting the rootball!!!! Growers take great care in keeping the rootball intact, ie. burlap, twine, steel cages.....and this guy is breaking it in half..... Also, the rotting roots/stump take N from the soil.....these trees will need constant fertilization.....These are 2 other reasons off the top of my head...not to keep you in suspense....
     
  5. bobbygedd

    bobbygedd LawnSite Fanatic
    from NJ
    Posts: 10,178

    i cant see that they are splitting the rootball. ok, so, rotting stumps take n from the soil, what else, im waiting...
     
  6. KenH

    KenH LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,622

    You are waiting for more??!!..Trees planted too deep, rootballs split, rotting stumps rob N, potential air pockets/sinkhole........you would be OK with this??

    I hope I didnt post one of your drawings.:p
     
  7. bobbygedd

    bobbygedd LawnSite Fanatic
    from NJ
    Posts: 10,178

    so i was right! i SAID "planted too deep", and "potential of sinking" . aparently, you didnt know, you waited for me to answer, then just said what i said. any other questions, just ask. u could learn alot from a dummy. anyway, it is my understanding that a shortage in nitrogen will affect leaf growth, not root and stem growth. correct? or not
     
  8. KenH

    KenH LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,622

    Not to hurt your feelings bobby, but a letter to the client has already been submitted , along with all the mentioned findings.:p :p I just thought you guys would enjoy this.

    So you think a lack of N affects only leaf growth?? What do the leaves do?? Thats right you say, a process called photosynthesis, which provides food for the WHOLE plant.
     
  9. GLAN

    GLAN Banned
    Posts: 1,647

    What about the roots left around the perimeter of the ground stump.


    What happens is the remains of the stump create a saucer. Roots of the new tree are not allowed to spread out, until the roots have rotted sufficiently, this will also make the tree susceptable to being blown over. Also the saucer collects water, not allowing it to drain, root rot. Yes the break down of the wood depleats N from the soil but that is a secondary problem and can be corrected. The former reasons provided are primary failure of such a planting.
     
  10. bobbygedd

    bobbygedd LawnSite Fanatic
    from NJ
    Posts: 10,178

    thanks to you ken, today, i am wiser than yesterday, but hopefully, not as smart as tommorow. i learn something everyday. today i learned about photosynthesis, and also learned, i cannot consume three 6 packs, as i did in my younger days, without vomiting. thanks for the knowledge
     

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