What machine/s are required?

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment & Pavement' started by Botabill, Apr 22, 2008.

  1. Botabill

    Botabill LawnSite Member
    Posts: 14

    I have an option of taking on a job I've never done before. It includes digging out a wet marshy area to make a pond. Pond would be about 40 feet across. Also need to trench out a feeder stream that is about 300 feet long. It probably should be trenched about 6 feet wide and 3feet deep. The excess soil should be bermed or spread out around the area after digging. Is there one machine (eg. case 580) that can do this or will a have to use an excavator, dozer or some other combination. Thanks!
     
  2. ksss

    ksss LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,129

    Sounds to my like an excavator would likely be enough but an LGP dozer wouldn't hurt.
     
  3. RockSet N' Grade

    RockSet N' Grade LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,454

    I did one like that last year with my excavator only........took a little while and was a little tricky at times dumping the machine into an unseen hole, but it worked great after I figured out my system of approach. I used the bucket as a feeler to feel the area where I was going to track into to make sure I didn't hit a hole......kinda like a blind man using a cane. After that and a little exploration to make sure I had good bottom, we went at it full throttle and it ended up being alot of fun....I would do it again in a heart beat......
     
  4. Gravel Rat

    Gravel Rat LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,544

    One thing you have to think about digging out marshy areas is it legal ?

    Also if its really swampy then you may sink out of sight so swamp mats for the excavator will be needed.
     
  5. Dirt Digger2

    Dirt Digger2 LawnSite Silver Member
    from PA
    Posts: 2,396

    your best option would be a 15 ton trackhoe...maybe even a 20 with wide tracks and a LGP dozer for making it look nice

    backhoes have their place, and this isn't it...you would spend more time covering your tracks then digging

    it can be done with just a trackhoe, but if you want the recommendation of the homeowner go with a dozer too...it will pay off in the long run
     
  6. Gravel Rat

    Gravel Rat LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,544

    A rubber tired hoe would sink out of sight in loon***.
     
  7. Botabill

    Botabill LawnSite Member
    Posts: 14

    I'd still like to hear more ideas on equipment but would also like to get some ball park ideas on what this should cost. I know a lot of variables come into play but I'm roughly estimating $3,600 dollars at this point (36 machine hours) What's everyones thoughts on that? Thanks!
     
  8. BIGBEN2004

    BIGBEN2004 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 823

    It all depends on how deep you have to muck before you hit bottom. 36 Hours seems like alittle low. I would bid that job higher since moving muck is not as easy as dirt. It takes a little longer, not to mention you also have to dig that 300 feet stream. Hopefully the EPA doesn't fly over you in a helicopter. I have a friend that put in a stream crossing for a farmer and next thing he knew a helicopter landed in the field beside him and gave him a nice fine.
     
  9. Gravel Rat

    Gravel Rat LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,544

    That is a little cheap especially when you will be spending a few hours or a few days trying to dig out the excavator that has sunk to the house works.

    Have you got any pictures ?
     
  10. Dirt Digger2

    Dirt Digger2 LawnSite Silver Member
    from PA
    Posts: 2,396

    $120 an hour for the hoe (15 ton) then another $95 for the dozer if you get one in there (CAT D4 sized)....then a pain in the as$ factor...then a transportation cost to help with your fuel to and from the site

    then again you could go with a D6 or D8 rental and just push the soup...depending just how "marshy" you are talking and get a mini trackhoe for a few hours and dig your trench
     

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