What parts of the country...

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by jim d., Jul 21, 2005.

  1. jim d.

    jim d. LawnSite Member
    Posts: 61

    would support year-round mowing? I live in Oklahoma and am just starting out. I expect to be able to work here until approximately mid-Oct/early Nov. I enjoy mowing and would rather do that instead of landscaping, pressure-washing, etc. I would like to work in Oklahoma March through Oct. and then perhaps move to another part of the country to mow during the winter.

    I'm wondering if there are any parts of the country that would support wintertime mowing, such as southern Texas, Louisiana, and the deep south...or would I maybe have to go to the desert states or California to find work during the winter?

    Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
     
  2. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    maybe southern mexico or maybe further south, like venezuela ...?
    anyplace with a temperate climate (non-tropical) will not support year-round mowing that I know of, even in florida it gets a bit nipply in the winter.
     
  3. skurkp

    skurkp LawnSite Member
    Posts: 248

    I live west of Houston in the Katy area, my accounts are set up to allow me to mow all year. Although I mow only twice a month in the months of Dec., Jan. and Feb. but I still get to mow. One thing you can do is set your customers up to invoice 12 months per year at a lower price per month. At least you keep an income during the winter. Good Luck
     
  4. T Edwards

    T Edwards LawnSite Member
    Posts: 230

    skurkp

    Are you familiar with King's X ?
     
  5. skurkp

    skurkp LawnSite Member
    Posts: 248

  6. out4now

    out4now LawnSite Bronze Member
    from AZ
    Posts: 1,796

    Arizona, Scottsdale, Phoenix, Chandler etc. Really hot in the summer though. People that live elsewhere where humidity is higher don't get the fact that you don't sweat that much with low humidity. We've had 18 deaths here in 5 days related to heat. 115 is not uncommon. Last week it was 118. Depends where you are in the valley though. Winter is overseeded bermuda with perennial rye grass. Green and easy to cut. Most guys make their money on installing those in the fall and make a lot on spring clean ups and desert landscape installs.
     
  7. T Edwards

    T Edwards LawnSite Member
    Posts: 230

    They were a 3-piece rock band in the '80s from Katy.
    CD's include Gretchen Goes To Nebraska, and Faith Hope Love. Unique sound.......
     
  8. jim d.

    jim d. LawnSite Member
    Posts: 61

    Thanks, skurkp, out4now and topsites. That's what I was hoping to hear. I think I'd enjoy the areas down by Houston as well as the southwest areas mentioned by out4now. Since I'd only be working there Nov. - Feb., I think I'd be okay in regard to the heat. I definately don't want to be working in 118 degree temps.

    As far as year-round billing, I've been wondering if there are problems with people feeling less inclined to send in payment when they aren't seeing you next week. Also, even if I were to do that I'd still want to go somewhere to work during the winter to stay in shape and have something steady to do.

    I know the northwest would probably be good but I wouldn't care for gray skies and rain all the time. It seems from my travels years ago that the southern California area around San Diego might be good, as well as the areas about 30 miles inland from San Francisco. Does anyone have any info on these areas?

    Thanks again for your help, guys.
     
  9. MowingInAZ

    MowingInAZ LawnSite Member
    Posts: 79

    Down here in Arizona you could make money mowing in the wintertime. Not all places in the Valley though, try some of the more upscale neighborhoods where people are more prone to have sprinkler systems like Paradise Valley, Scottsdale, and some parts of Phoenix.
     
  10. jim d.

    jim d. LawnSite Member
    Posts: 61

    Thank you, MowingInAZ.

    I'm glad to know there are several areas around the country where I could continue to work during the winter. Thanks again to all who offered suggestions.
     

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