What skid steer for school?

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment & Pavement' started by Turfsnow, May 22, 2005.

  1. Turfsnow

    Turfsnow LawnSite Member
    from NH
    Posts: 12

    This is my first post so excuse me if I screw this up. I am a landscaper (part time) and an assistant agricultural science teacher (full time), and our program is looking into getting a skid steer. I have been teaching for three years and I have been trying to convince the instructor that we should get one because that is where the industry is going. The instructor went to the local Mustang dealer and he thinks he got a good price on a 2044, and he is almost certain this is the one to get. He has never operated a skid steer, and I have only operated and 873 bobcat. The Bobcat has hand/feet controls, and the mustang has hand and “T” bar control, I believe. How does that work? We are looking for something under 20k, around or above 50hp, ability to pick up a ton. We have 30 to 40 students enrolled that will have the chance to operate it.
    Any info that anyone has would be greatly appreciated. Opinions also wanted.
     
  2. 2004F550

    2004F550 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 270

    I have a mustang 2040 which is the 2044's cousin. I believe the 2044 is the same rating etc. Anyway I would recomend the mustang to your school. The T Bar control is very easy to learn and would be the best option for 40 students in my opinion. As for being the best skid steer, no, but in this case it seems that ease of use would be more important. Also, I would try and haggle the price, Im not sure about your area but around here I have the only Mustang around I believe. Your dealer may drop the price to get a machine into a school like that because it will help get their name out there. Just my 2 cents :D
     
  3. SCAG POWER

    SCAG POWER LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 343

    I vote for the Bob Cat S250 with A/C,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Now thats cool, 98 degrees out side cold on the inside........................ :waving:
     
  4. ksss

    ksss LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,131

    If held stictly to the 2000 pound ROC and the 20K price tag with no prefence on vertical or radial lift pattern you have several good choices. I would opt for a hand control only machine as they are IMHO more easy to learn and are more the industry standard. All of the machines being preowned to meet the 20K price limit, I look for a CASE 70XT, 75XT or 85XT, BOBCAT 863, 873 (hand control optioned units), CAT 246. I would try and stay with a machine that will offer some resale when your ready update. The MUSTANG probably will not give you much of a resale return on your investment.
     
  5. 2004F550

    2004F550 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 270

    that machine will only pick up 1300lbs btw
     
  6. Turfsnow

    Turfsnow LawnSite Member
    from NH
    Posts: 12

    KSSS
    Thanks for info. One of my students family just picked up a 2054 a few weeks ago so I don't know if they will haggle knowing that.
    SCAG POWER
     
  7. Turfsnow

    Turfsnow LawnSite Member
    from NH
    Posts: 12

    See told you guys I was new at this and that I would screw up. Anyways...
    SCAG POWER
    I have AC in the 873 that I run and I love it. This skid steer will be for the students and I have a hard enough time getting them to work without fighting over a tractor, I can't imagine what they would do for a vehicle with AC.
    KSSS
    Resale isn't that big of a concern for us, we hang on to equipment for a long time. The program bought in the mid 80's (can't remember year) John Deere 950 tractor and it has less than 5000 hours on it.
    I heard today that Bobcat came close to matching the Mustang offer on a S150. I personally would like the program to get a bobcat because I know the dealer and they are fast and reliable, but I know nothing about the machine. If the two machines are similar then it might come down to budget. Thanks everyone for the help.
     
  8. lars

    lars LawnSite Member
    Posts: 117

    I think the New Holland / Deere route may be good, with the prefernce on the Deere. If you are teaching many people how to use this thing you want the safest machine possible. The low center of gravity on these machines is a big plus. I could easily see a taller machine tip or at least come very close. A lack of power may be not so bad, too. You probably don't want anybody going nuts on the machine.
     

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