What to do about the association...

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by topsites, May 3, 2006.

  1. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    I have a problem lol, likely I helped foster the situation but regardless, it has gotten to that point where something needs to give or I'm out. The money is a nice chunk but it doesn't help when I'm already doing labor for 40 dollars / hour and these guys want nothing less than at least twice what I'm already doing, ten times more would be nice and yesterday, too.

    Basically it's a contract bid that an association controls, it all started with the fax guy who liked to send his comments on monday to the president who next sends it to me. All is well until a few weeks later the special little requests kept increasing up to a point where about 5 or 10 of the guys are now sending it via spam all to the same guy and I get to hear it next.

    Either way, I'm already several hundred dollars over budget and can not spend my time honoring special requests because it never ends, and it's either me and their little requests and then I do absolutely nothing else which won't work for long... Or I have a half a mind of doing what I should've done all along as the lowest bidder, which is the bare minimum.

    I'm to the point where I'm ready to basically tell it to them in roughly the words above, take it or leave it because if we continue to fail to reach an agreement which means let me do my job while everybody stays out of my boat, unless some immediate changes happen I see no other option but to hand in my resignation at this time.

    All I'm asking for is some opinions from folks who have dealt with this association bs before where everyone and their brother wants you to treat them special, and what you did to keep from losing your tail, other than throw in the towel.

    thanks
     
  2. TurfProSTL

    TurfProSTL LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 693

    If its extra work they're requesting, your question should be "Who do I bill for this?"
     
  3. LawnTamer

    LawnTamer LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,986

    That's exactly right. I had a contract like that once, the list of little extras kept growing and growing, after about 2 weeks I talked with the property manager and laid out my case in a cool rational manner. Actually made pretty good money off the extras, more per man hr than the actual contract work.
     
  4. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    I believe this has helped a lot to put me in the right direction.
    Here is what I am thinking of submitting in written form:

    .........................................
    It has come to my attention there has been an ever-increasing amount of special requests being made. To take care of such requests consumes labor hours, a budgeted and highly limited resource in a lowest bid environment, a considerable challenge I ask we all face with the most realistic outlook possible.
    To maintain and renew this complex requires several years of my resources for several hours a week, during which time attention is paid to raw production rather than detail, a long-term, complicated process which is likely best ignored.
    Having honored a few special requests, the company's budget has been exceeded by several hundred dollars and thus I must ask that any future special requests be accompanied by a payment to the treasurer after I am allowed the opportunity to estimate said request, the payment would compensate for labor and possible supplies involved in taking care of same.
    To further alleviate the current dilemma involving the process of communication, please feel free to send any communications directly to myemail at mydomain.com, or you may also fill out the estimate form on the web site.
    ty and all that...
     
  5. SWD

    SWD LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 989

    Nope, do not confuse this issue with a wordy explaination.
    Simply approach the person of whom signed your contract and ask "Who gets these bills?"
    The more youdebate an issue, the more it can be debated/argued/price reduced.
    These people want extra work, they pay for it = business is business.
     

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