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What to do in slow season in Texas

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by scott015, May 31, 2001.

  1. scott015

    scott015 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 37

    I am planning on starting my own business next spring. But I am trying to gather all the information I can right now. The main thing I am worried about, is probably the same thing 100% of you guys worry about....MONEY! I live in Arlington Texas, it stays warm here for a while, but there are a couple months of cold...but yet we get NO snow to plow...so I was wondering what I should plan on doing...I have searched this thing up and down and read tons on letters about contracts. I dont really understand the best way...seasonal contract or pay by mow??? If I set up a contract...doesnt that insure me money in the Dec,Jan,Feb months too? So why would I not want to do it that way??? Or am I supposed to budget my money enough to have extra saved up in the summer for those couple of months???
  2. TurfGuyTX

    TurfGuyTX LawnSite Senior Member
    from DFW
    Posts: 648

    12 month contracts will help you get through the Winter. Think of it like TXU cost averaging your electric bill. You get paid the same when there is less work, just as you get when there is more.
  3. RedOak

    RedOak LawnSite Member
    from DFW
    Posts: 20

    Extra services you can provide are tree work (pruning, installs, and removals), Fall/winter (pretty much the same season here) clean ups (leaves, limbs, and litter), and landscaping ( install flower beds or prep for next season, retaining walls , stone walks, etc.). In years past I have built fences and decks, interior painting, power washing, and other services that do not come to mind right now. After you have established your company and client base many of these services can be sold to your existing customers. Depending on how much work/income you desire during these "off months" use fliers or other means of advertising stating what services you wish to provide and blanket the neighborhoods you want to work in. As far as 12 month contracts go, you may find that it scares some residential customers away (at least the "middle class"). Commercial properties generally are more likely to want full service 12 months out of the year.
  4. Mike (MLC)

    Mike (MLC) LawnSite Member
    Posts: 184

    We don't do 12 month contracts for our residential people. During the slow part of the year we do tree trimming and leaf clean- ups. That along with what we can mow off and on keep us going during the 2 slow months.
  5. TurfGuyTX

    TurfGuyTX LawnSite Senior Member
    from DFW
    Posts: 648

    Not all of our residential customers are on contract. But we certainly don't discourage it. There are lots of things to do in the Winter. Spring clean in steps, early. Can you talk some of your customers into overseeding? That'll keep you going some. Good luck.

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