What to do with poo

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by stimpy, May 19, 2008.

  1. stimpy

    stimpy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 67

    I was picking up a bag of milorganite at home depot to keep the deer out of my cowpeas for awhile and some lady starts in on me with the toxic stuff bad bad bad....My smart azz reply was your right i would rather see it in the rivers and my drinking water.. What do you guys and girl think should be done with human and animal waste.
     
  2. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    Tough subject with me

    It is a good question though

    I figure you would be better off sprinkling arsenic, lead and pieces of condoms on your breakfast, probably have a better chance

    without going on a rant, please do not use it in yards that have pets or children or edible gardens or where people walk or sit or talk or get near

    I like the answer "well its better than it was" how many billions in future medical bills does "better than it was" cost

    Not to mention steroids, pharmaceuticals.............oops I said no rant

    So are you saying that the deer are smarter than we are??? they will not get near it????? Smart deer
     
  3. DUSTYCEDAR

    DUSTYCEDAR LawnSite Fanatic
    from PA
    Posts: 5,137

    Hummmmmmmmmmm I Like Bills Point
     
  4. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,082

    Is it possible that the sewage actually going into the the Wisconsin River, as liquified om, is better than becoming - solids and "CYCLING", thru a lawn. [However I doubt it]

    At this point I will ask straight out: "What is the best and final destination of human sewage???"
    " from the cities???"

    In rural America there is no question about what we can do to eliminate human waste.

    You city folks need to figure out what you can do in "reality": to deal with the problem.

    In this neighborhood it either gets "recycled" or accumulates in New Olreans. [via, the Mississippi River]
     
  5. quiet

    quiet LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 720

    I'll say it. I'll get it, but I'll say it.

    I think adding a percentage of PROCESSED municipal sewage into conventional fertilizers is an excellent way of returning otherwise useless waste into the ecosystem. It's benefits far outweigh it's downside.

    But Sun Prairie always haunts me. I went to UW (class of '77) and lived near Madison until 1987.
     
  6. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    worms are my answer, or proper long term composting to bioremediat/Phytoremediat the stuff,after that we are really talking about a bad thing made worse by collecting it.

    next step, to many humans to the square foot. that's a dicey topic
     
  7. BRANDMEL

    BRANDMEL LawnSite Member
    Posts: 58

    I've been away for a-while, but I had to pipe up on this thread!
    Here's a good one! There is a farmer in Oregon that gets paid $2.5 million each year to haul away over 30,000 tons of biosolids from the city of Portland. The farmer then uses it on canola crops. (he has over 17,000 acres of farmland and a bio-diesel facility) This farm then uses the canola to make bio-diesel to run the trucks that get paid to haul the waste. The business of taking on sludge for a profit is a lucrative one.
     
  8. treegal1

    treegal1 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,911

    hey theres an idea, grow algae with sludge and make fuel.
     
  9. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,082

    There was another practice of creating a swamp like area and continually added the sludge on one end and clean water coming out on the other end. Feeding into a manmade pond. They found that poplar trees worked the best for that.

    Right now most communities "process it" and dump it in the river. Then blame the farmers for N in the rivers. Does anyone know if Chicago is still pumping it into Lake Michigan? The "processed" stuff, I mean :)
     
  10. stimpy

    stimpy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 67

    My labs would get a skin rash if they went southern lake michigan. No problem up north.
     

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