1. Missed the live Ask the Expert event?
    Not to worry. Check out the archived thread of the Q&A with Ken Hutcheson, President of U.S. Lawns, and the LawnSite community in the Franchising forum .

    Dismiss Notice

What to Do?

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by jimmyzlc, Oct 4, 2007.

  1. jimmyzlc

    jimmyzlc LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 376

    I justed started my biz full-time this year and love it even with all the headaches. I hope to expand next year and make that leap and hire a full time employee. Here's my quandry, today I was approached by a former collegue (Golf Course Superintendent) about returning to my old line of work. He is on the board of the local country club. The offer intrigues me as the job would be in town at a 9 hole country club. What runs through my mind are these questions. Can you run a full time business and work full-time? Am I fooling myself for even thinking this way. My wife is actually intrigued with the idea also, so that helps.

    One reason I am considering this is it has been a tough year and half on my family financially. It would be nice to have a stable income, plus some money to pump into the business. What to you guys think? Is it doable, stupid idea, can it work, bring it give me your opinions.
  2. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    No, you can't, that's the simple answer.
    Either go work full-time or dedicate yourself to your business, the first year always is a bit rough. You'll likely do much better your 2nd but if you try and do both things now then you'll never become completely independent from the crutch of a stable income and your business will not flourish like it should.

    If the offer is merely intriguing, sounds to me like the income is not good enough. :laugh:
  3. Iloveroses

    Iloveroses LawnSite Member
    Posts: 15

    If you can make it doable then your really good. For me, I can not work full time and have my own business. No one is better than you handling it.
  4. ExclusiveLawnCare

    ExclusiveLawnCare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 304

    You think you have headaches doing it full-time now. Think about it when and if you take the second job offer. I think thats way too much work for ya there buddy.
  5. jimmyzlc

    jimmyzlc LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 376

    Another factor in this potential opportunity is my brother in law. He workers in a factory and hates it and is dying to get out. I have mentioned it to him before about working for me and he has gone out with me and likes working outside. He has a good work ethic, I'd have to match his hourly rate which I could do and I would have no problem bringing him on. Keep the responses coming.
  6. heather lawn sp

    heather lawn sp LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 681

    Been there
    Done that

    Superintendant at a small 9 hole private owner golf course
    Lawn spraying and fertilizing
    contract mowed 21 schools for the school board
    other general mowing


    a supervisor / mechanic / sprayman
    2 mower operators
    1 golf course worker
    1 Saturday and Sunday high school student

    The mowing crew would spend half a day with the golf course worker mowing the roughs with our 2 mowers and the golf course mower
    That lasted 3 seasons until the golf course owner decided he wanted a full time superintendant
  7. heather lawn sp

    heather lawn sp LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 681

    Topsites. . .
    Don't you do this work part-time or am I thinking of someone else?
  8. jimmyzlc

    jimmyzlc LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 376

    I do know going in I'll be required to full fill 40 hours a week. I've done a 9 hole course before I know what it takes to get it done.
  9. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    First off what you are experiencing is normal at this early stage in the game.

    That having been said business owners don't match other employer's rates, that is unheard of. If your brother hates his job so much then he should care less, evidently you are still exposing a need (or a vulnerability) and he sees that, eliminate the need for his help and this problem is gone as well. On this note, what is happening is you're compromising the integrity of your business, you will want to start working on eliminating these compromises in the next 3-5 years, which you start now so it can get accomplished in that time.

    Now he can either take your offer at what you originally intended to pay, or he can keep on working where he is, that is how it works.
  10. jimmyzlc

    jimmyzlc LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 376

    Good advice Topsite. There a lot of factors I have not even hit on here that come into play. One is my oldest daughter, she works with me and really likes it. She got her first taste of a landscape install from the ground up and I think she got hooked. We got one this weekend to do and she can't to go with me to help pick out the plant material. She also likes to mow.

Share This Page