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What to expect from your partner?

Discussion in 'Business Operations' started by the ace, Jan 16, 2006.

  1. the ace

    the ace LawnSite Member
    from usa
    Posts: 147

    Am I wrong in expecting my partner to try and further the advancement of our new company. In the last thirty days he has not put in more than 2 hours of time toward our business venture. I realize it's winter but I can come up with about a million things that need to be done. Every morning my brain is thinking of what I can do to help our cause, my partner sees to it that all his personal needs are met and as long as it hasn't snowed plops down in his favorite chair to watch some tv! Actually I don't know what he's doing but I do know he's not helping our business. I won't ever be satisfied, if we have enough customers than we need to work on getting rid of the low dollar customers and replace them with higher dollar ones, but either way there's always room for improvement. I plan on being just a manager of this business in about five years and I will get there with my partner or not. I told my partner we are having a meeting to discuss his lack of ambition, who knows I may have to go solo, but either way I have a five year plan and come hell or high water I will reach my goals!
  2. work_it

    work_it LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 976

    The best thing you can do is "go solo". It's obvious that you have a lot more ambition and motovation than your partner. Just from what you've wrote it seems that your joint venture is clearly going to fail. Better now than later when he tries to claim half of the company without putting 1% of effort into it.
  3. Jpocket

    Jpocket LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,278

    Partners are never a good idea unless it's father son.
  4. sheshovel

    sheshovel LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,112

    Maybe you need to make yourself clear on what you expect him to do.
  5. rbriggs

    rbriggs LawnSite Member
    Posts: 106

    Hey Ace,
    It sounds like you went into business with MY former business partner. His contribution to the businiess was about as much as your partner. He was very gung-ho up until three months after being in business. Suddenly, he was around less and less. That was the beginning of the end. My wife and I eventually bought him out for what he initially paid into the business.
    It was an important lesson learned. I'll never take on a partner again, unless of course it is a silent partner and his silence is spelled out in detail in a partnership agreement.
    What I will tell you is that communication is very important is such situations and you need so sit down with your partner and discuss things. If he has lost interest, buy him out.
  6. walker-talker

    walker-talker LawnSite Platinum Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 4,771

    Save yourself a lot of pain, aggravation and delays in your goals and drop him now.
  7. Bunton Guy

    Bunton Guy LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,754

    The only time partner is good...is when they are just as eager as you.
  8. lawnwizards

    lawnwizards LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,434

    the question that needs to be asked is, how does he work when the grass is growing? me and my partner have a similar situation. eventually i'm gonna be the paperwork, estimate man and hes gonna be the bullwhip for the workers. maybe you need to find out what he wants to come out of this situation?
  9. mtdman

    mtdman LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,137

    Sound like every story I ever heard about partners, including mine. Dump him and go solo. That's the best advice I can give you.
  10. allinearth

    allinearth LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 609

    Been there, done that. Cut the string now. Might be a little rough at first but it will pay off.

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