When the temps drop. Why are some lawns green, and others not?

Discussion in 'Fertilizer Application' started by spray_man, Dec 30, 2010.

  1. fl-landscapes

    fl-landscapes LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,542

    the reason I used the word frost in this case was because the recent frost. I should have phrased it differently I guess like "one may be a more cold tolerant variety than the other and not effected by the frost" .....either way, splitting hairs. We are all guessing, as we have not been on the property. Or did you drive out to inspect, sensai?
     
  2. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,946

    Hey

    I gave you credit for some very good insight as to why some grasses response different to Cold/Frost.

    But the Pebble is still in MY hand. :cool2:
     
  3. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    Gotta love Ric's ego :)
     
  4. fl-landscapes

    fl-landscapes LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,542

    and how warm and fuzzy he is.
     
  5. Keith

    Keith LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,977

    My conclusion is that frost is more damaging to most St. Augustine than temperatures in the 27-32F range. Almost all SA lawns in this area are brown except under the trees. Under the trees it looks no worse than it did before the freezing weather.
     
  6. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,946

    Keith

    The morning after the first cold snap with wind of the season tells the tale. Depending on which side of the house you are on and which direction the wind came, The turf color will vary from Green, Purple and Even brown.

    I agree Frost does more damage than just cold and that is seen by green areas where the wind stopped the frost from settling on the turf. 27 to 28 for a period of time seems to be the Cold Tolerances of many plants and not the magic number of 32 that most people think.
     

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