When to water my lawn in sandy soil?

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by turbosl2, Jul 8, 2012.

  1. turbosl2

    turbosl2 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 56

    I think its really sandy soil. I can take a picture so you guys can tell me what you think. I have some issues that make this hard to figure out. The distance on the rotors is ~35-40' radius (so thats a large circle). The pressure is not hte best since i am 550' from the road. The nozzle sizes are not huge, about 2-3GPM per head, and mostly 2heads on a zone, some have 4 but they have smaller nozzles. I have 16zones so when you add all that up, the time for each zone, sandy soil, full sun yard from dusk to dawn, it makes for a challenge. I will get some pics. Be back later tonight after dinner
     
  2. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    You might get better heckling, err advise over in the irrigation section of the forum.

    Need to know things like, static pressure, working pressure, line sizes, meter size. Head - brand/ type
     
  3. turbosl2

    turbosl2 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 56

    Here are some pics of the soil and the yard

    102_1175.jpg

    102_1176.jpg

    102_1177.jpg

    102_1179.jpg
     
  4. cgaengineer

    cgaengineer LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 15,782

    No offense turbosl but that lawn is way beyond watering at this point. That lawn needs a renovation.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  5. maynardGkeynes

    maynardGkeynes LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 409

    If by outdoor landscapes, you mean the politically connected agribiz, I believe you. If you mean home lawns, that is total BS.
     
  6. cgaengineer

    cgaengineer LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 15,782

    I think what he is saying is true, maybe not in your area but in areas where drought is common and the area is heavily populated.

    I've always thought that nothing was more wasteful than using treated drinking water to irrigate lawns. Some cities have a reuse line that you are able to tie into for irrigation. Water is sometimes less than 1/2 the cost of treated water. The great thing about cities offering this is that instead of several hundred acres of empty land with sprinklers (land application) its applied to customers lawns. Yes you still have to pay for it, but it's less than treated water and it's just as good for your lawn.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  7. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    Exactly.

    How many Ag's are using potable water :dizzy:.
     
  8. Duekster

    Duekster LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 7,961

    If the heat wave continues they can use Bermuda :laugh:
     
  9. cgaengineer

    cgaengineer LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 15,782

    I would think not many...non around here for that matter. I just saw a large farm 10-15 miles from me dig a very large lake and install huge pumps and sprinklers for cotton...no way you could irrigate cotton/soy beans with drinking water and remain competitive.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  10. cgaengineer

    cgaengineer LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 15,782

    Probably a wiser choice!

    The op said he couldn't afford a topdress, at $7 per 1000 gallons of water around here I would think you could amend 2 acres with compost to handle irrigation cheaper in the long run than continually irrigating 2 acres. I cannot imagine how much that costs.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     

Share This Page