Where do you buy plants and shrubs

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by Bluegrass Lawn Service, Jan 26, 2006.

  1. Bluegrass Lawn Service

    Bluegrass Lawn Service LawnSite Member
    Posts: 98

    I have been in the business for 10 years with mostly lawn mowing, mulching and maintenance. My question for you is where do you folks get your plants/shrubs/trees. I have been doing some landscaping design and installation but have been buying these items around my area at nurseries. I get a discount but I know I should be able to get them at a wholesale price.
    Do I need to belong to an association have a license or what. Hopefully you can help me. I'm in southeastern Indiana. Thanks
     
  2. Stuttering Stan

    Stuttering Stan LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,504

    I can't help you in Indiana, but I buy from 2 local wholesale nurseries. Although the "wholesale" prices doesn't seem much lower than retail, there are large acres of shrubs/plants to choose from. Price shouldn't be that much of a problem because you should be passing that price onto customers plus your labor/profit. The only requirement to buy wholesale is to have a business license in agriculture.
     
  3. TurfdudeNCSU

    TurfdudeNCSU LawnSite Member
    Posts: 76

    You need to visit a wholesale nursery. Most of the time you have to give them a business license and fill out some paper work in order to buy from them.
     
  4. grass gorilla

    grass gorilla LawnSite Member
    Posts: 2

    if you aren't paying alot less than retail, you need another wholesaler. depending on your clientele some will now what a plant costs as they very well may have already done some research. Many landscapers however have to guarantee the plant will survive for a year, as long as the customer waters it properly. In that case you need to charge 2 1/2 to 3 times what you paid for it. so a 20 dollar cost to you should be 60 to the customer, not including the labor to plant it. Remember, If that plant dies the guarantee only covers the plant. You can charge to replant it, or they can replant it themselves.
     
  5. LandscapePro

    LandscapePro LawnSite Member
    Posts: 138

    Mike,

    I don't know about up north, but down here I buy direct from the grower on trees and shrubs. I "am" the grower as far as color material.

    You might have to work with a wholesaler up that way, a broker that brings material in from all over.

    I don't know if a Landscape Contractor's License is required in your state or not. If so, get that squared away if you're going to be doing installs. There may be some sort of nursery type license as well. Ya never know until you start making some phone calls.

    Try getting in touch with the Dept. of Agriculture.

    Mike
    La. Landscape Contractor #2576
     
  6. Bigtreeman

    Bigtreeman LawnSite Member
    Posts: 24

    I will be a broker this summer, getting into it this year.
     
  7. AtoZ

    AtoZ LawnSite Member
    Posts: 107

    In Iowa all you need is a Retail Sales Tax ID Number. I do business with Nurseries in Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois and Oregon. Some nurseries require your ID #'s to be kept on file some don't. It's seems when you initially contact a sales rep of a particular nursery on the phone or visit them in person - they immediately know if your in the trade or not... I very rarely ever have to give proof that I'm in the landscaping business...

    Hope this helps...
     
  8. AtoZ

    AtoZ LawnSite Member
    Posts: 107

    Wholesale prices tend to run about 50% at minimum to retail prices. When buying wholesale you tend to KEYSTONE individual pieces. Buy a #1 Daylilly for $3.25 sell for $6.50. Some plants you can get away with even more - it really depends on your demographics, city people tend to have to pay more. I'll buy a 2.5" caliper Celebration Maple for $150 and sell it for $350 plus installation... Some boxwood I purchase for $20 and sell for $60. It also depends on the plant material. Plant quality makes a huge difference in selling price and your image.
     

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