Which color temp to use on this brick?

Discussion in 'Landscape Lighting' started by starry night, Jul 1, 2013.

  1. starry night

    starry night LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,539

    Any suggestions from you guys on which color temperature LED to use on this soft-red brick? 2700K or 3000K. I will also be using some spread lights among the plantings.

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    Last edited: Jul 1, 2013
  2. Lite4

    Lite4 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,104

    Phil, go 2700k.
     
  3. INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting

    INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,102

    I would put way more attention on the CRI of the lamps you are considering and take particular note of the CIE diagrams and charts. Go with the highest CRI you can find and pay particular attention to the red spectrum numbers. I would suggest 3000k with CRI of 80+ and a high R9 number.
     
  4. starry night

    starry night LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,539

    Thanks Tim and James for your conflicting opinions.
    I use the good LEDs (wink,wink). My concern is that I wouldn't want the home to look too orange. James, I have to do a little more studying before I can understand those CIE charts.
     
  5. bcg

    bcg LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Tx
    Posts: 1,836

    I lit a similar color brick (just a little more peach in mine) with 2900K and was happy with the outcome so I'd go with the 3000K or, demo 1 of each and use what the customer likes better.
     
  6. starry night

    starry night LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,539

    Thanks to you, too, Bernie. I was hoping someone out there had experienced a brick near that color. I like the warmth of 2700k on tan or gray-colored brick or stone but I was worried the 2700 might be too warm for this brick and that the reflected color would be orange-ish.
     
  7. INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting

    INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,102

    With LED, there is a lot more to colour than simply picking a colour temperature. One Brand's 3000k will look completely different than another's. Does it have a blue shift, a green hue or a strong red component? Unfortunately far too few manufactures publish their spectral data. Knowing, understanding and using this info is what will separate you from the crowd.
     
  8. bcg

    bcg LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Tx
    Posts: 1,836

    You're right, of course, but in general terms with all other things being equal (and I realize they aren't), I think the brick is going to look better a little cooler rather than warmer. I'm betting that Phil already has a single manufacturer that he's using and happy with so if that manufacturer, say Illumacare for example, offers a lamp in 2700K and 3000K, I'd say start with the 3000K.

    I think with the "regulars" here, we have to take it on faith that they've already done the research to choose a good lamp and just give opinions based on that assumption. Phil has been around here enough for us to know he's not a trunk slammer... :)
     
  9. starry night

    starry night LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,539

    Bernie, You are right on several counts. And thank you for the friendly words.
     
  10. INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting

    INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,102

    I am certainly not suggesting anything untoward about anyone's understanding or knowledge. Just trying to open some eyes about the intricacies of using LED light sources. Architectural lighting is far more challenging to get right when you are not armed with all of the pertinent information. I am seeing more colour issues with more product as product lines change, update and broaden. It all comes down to how detailed you want to be, and how good is good enough.
     

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