Which Lesco product is everyone using for winterizer?

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by dwost, Oct 15, 2004.

  1. dwost

    dwost LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,666

    What are your preferences? I'm in Northern OH (zone 5 or 6 I believe)

    TIA
     
  2. cemars

    cemars LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 387

    I like the 34-3-11 20% PSCU, a lot of bang for you buck.
     
  3. Tscape

    Tscape LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,370

    I believe it is 32-3-8 with no slow release.
     
  4. SodKing

    SodKing LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,648

    28-5-12 50%ppscu 3%fe
     
  5. TSM

    TSM LawnSite Senior Member
    from MA
    Posts: 707

    I cant answer because I dont use Lesco.

    But I am curious, I was recently in my local lesco service center (i do like the guys who work there, so i stop in every now and then) and they had a big sign behind the counter
    WINTERIZE WITH 21-3-21 75%ppscu

    they couldnt tell me why that particular analysis

    would anyone here use this product for a late fall feeding? and why?
     
  6. ThreeWide

    ThreeWide LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,116


    To me, winterizer is to provide a feeding that will prepare the turf for periods of stress and also provide some stored nutrients for next Spring. What I look for is a high analysis of potassium which the 21-3-21 is. Something that is mostly nitrogen (32-3-8) is not a good example of a winterizer IMO.

    Every climate zone and turf differs in requirements. For example with Bermuda in our area I winterize with a 5-10-31 because we don't want to apply much nitrogen this late in the year. If your turf is still in a growth stage, applying some nitrogen is fine. You just don't want to promote heavy growth prior to dormancy.
     
  7. TSM

    TSM LawnSite Senior Member
    from MA
    Posts: 707

    Most turf experts recommend a 3-1-2 or 4-1-2 ratio of N-P-K on an established lawn. and that a lawn fertilizer should have at least one-half of its nitrogen in one of the slow-release forms. (although there is much debate about a late fall or 'winterizer' application and slow release N)

    so the 21-3-21 is a bit out of whack? and I feel 75% ppscu is definately out of whack.

    they (lesco) did say there biggest seller is the 34-3-11 20%scu

    so the only conclusion i come up with for this service center to bepushing 21-3-21......well, i'll let everyone else come up with their own conclusion.
     
  8. SodKing

    SodKing LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,648

    The UNH Cooperative extensions recommendation is usually 19-19-19. Which I find interesting as I went to UNH and the professors at the time did recommend a fertilizer with a 3-1-2 or 4-1-3 ratio. That being said, the state of Maine is phasing out the use of Phosphorous in fertilizers and NH is said to be close behind. This will lead to most of our fertilizers in the area having a 3-0-2 or 4-0-3 ratio.

    I think Lesco's 21-0-21 fertilizer is an excellent fertilizer in the NH area. It will provide enough Nitrogen to accomodate current growth. Plenty of potassium to improve disease resistance. The product is extremely slow release. This is fine for this area, whatever is not used by the plant will freeze in the soil and be ready for use by the plant in the spring for an early green up.

    I prefer the 28-5-12 as it releases more quickly and has a higher % iron to improve color.
     
  9. normally a winterizer contains a high rate of k!
    8-4-24
    21-0-21

    alot depends on when you make application, and what % slow release and from what source!

    In my zone their is no need for a winterizer, because the winters are very mild for cool season turf, but if i was growing a warm season turf, winterizer would be a must!

    My cool season turf receives a low n, high k, with fe for a early summer application!
     
  10. turf hokie

    turf hokie LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,744

    I use 32-5-7 25% ppscu or 34-3-11 20% ppscu. Applied late oct thru november. gets into the root system before dormancy for early spring green up.
     

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