Which skid steers are not computerized?

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment & Pavement' started by blaster2005, Mar 7, 2007.

  1. blaster2005

    blaster2005 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 9

    I'm new to the forum and skid steers! I have been shopping for a new or late model low hour skid steer. I have noticed Bobcat, New Holland ect are computerized like modern cars & trucks. I was told Doosan Daewoo and Thomas are simple to work on and no computer to deal with. Is this true? And are their any other brands with no computer? Any info would be appreciated!
     
  2. bobbyg18

    bobbyg18 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 166

    i own a Thomas 153 and has been good to me so far (300 hours)...very simple machine...no bells or whistles, but the company is financial trouble...their machines have very good power and the price is very attractive on these machines, this is probably because of the problems within the management of the company...good luck
     
  3. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,794

    If your going to buy a new skid steer, buy it for its "new skid steer" reliability and warranty, otherwise why not just buy a Case 1845?

    Besides that, computerized cab or not, changing a hydraulic hose is changing a hydraulic hose, and unless you have a full set of diesel engine diagnostic tools, you'll need a dealer anyways.
     
  4. Scag48

    Scag48 LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,067

    Yeah, never heard of a skid breaking down due to computer/electrical malfunctions. There isn't as much going on in there as you think.
     
  5. ksss

    ksss LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,131

    The biggest culprits (computer or electronic problems) that I have heard of is with Bobcats Boss system. I think those machines have to be the most computerized that I am aware of.
     
  6. tallrick

    tallrick LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 682

    I second the opinion on Thomas. Those are nice, simple machines- remind me of what Bobcat was 20 years ago. Most other machines with computer gadgets just use them to control add-ons or the interlock system. Fixing the problems simply involved ordering the part and giving the customer a heartattack when they see the price. This was another reason I got tired of repairing equipment. Who really wants (or needs) a microprocessor in a skid steer? Although some non-electronic equipment can be miserable to work on also. Those Scat-Trak loaders used cables to connect to some controls. You would be surprised how many times those got jammed up.
     

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