While I do office stuff

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by FIMCO-MEISTER, Aug 13, 2008.

  1. Trying to troubleshoot a TORO hydraulic system. N. O. and have a supply line leak. So I shut down the valves with my hose do-dad and now have the supply line under pressure hoping to find the leak after I finish paper stuff.

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  2. DanaMac

    DanaMac LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,156

    I'd like to take a class sometime to learn about hydro systems. It's all greek to me.
     
  3. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 47,342

    I'm surprised they can last as long as they do, given the troubles that a rodent could cause them.
     
  4. We don't have tunneling rodents here so not a problem. They do last a long time. Some still have the original valves from 30 years ago. If I was managing a golf course that was prone to lightning I'd want my system to be hydraulic.. If you think having all red wire for zones is a headache if cut. Try putting 20 hydraulic tubes back together with one being the supply.:dizzy:
     
  5. EagleLandscape

    EagleLandscape LawnSite Platinum Member
    Male, from Garland, Texas
    Posts: 4,347

    peter, looks like fun:)
     
  6. CAPT Stream Rotar

    CAPT Stream Rotar LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,908

    godspeed peter!

    I'd love to learn more about those.
     
  7. irritation

    irritation LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,221

    Toro does have a "hose do-dad" - hose end to hydraulic tubing connection. But your's is much bigger.
     
  8. I just did a hydraulic to electric conversion last week on a Toro system at a ball field with Toro 640s ....Added a new ESP MC 16 and a 12 zone Toro converter... Easy conversion and the system is a normally open hydraulic type...
     
  9. Waterit

    Waterit LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,906

    He's from Texas, of COURSE it's bigger:rolleyes:
     
  10. Without A Drought

    Without A Drought LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 999

    god bless ya. out of about 2,000 systems, we have maybe 5 that are still hydraulic, and they're on life support. if they go down, i turn the system off, give them an estimate to change to electric, and i'm on my way. up here it's rather difficult to get the parts to service those systems. thankfully, they're almost always manifolded right at the foundation and relatively easy (not inexpensive) to convert.
     

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