why a GFI trips

Discussion in 'Landscape Lighting' started by pete scalia, Sep 30, 2007.

  1. pete scalia

    pete scalia LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 960

    Ever get that customer who will not accept the fact that GFI's do trip on ocassion but they are convinced it's the root of a much deeper problem namely the lighting system which happens to be plugged into it. That's why I've gone to hardwiring-No more tripped GFI's.
     
  2. Lite4

    Lite4 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,109

    Pete, I have toyed around with the same notion of hardwiring. however, I havn't had too much trouble with GFIs tripping from plugs yet.
     
  3. INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting

    INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,102

    We get GFI Receptacles tripping here all the time. Mostly caused by nearby lightning strikes (water strikes seem to be the worst). I suspect that surges and transients are coming through the ground, inducting into the wiring system and tripping the GFI recepticles. Although it may be some other thing, who knows.

    To remedy this I have been specifying GFI breakers be installed on the circuits that power my LV lighting transformers. They cost a lot more initially but they are far less suceptible to 'false tripping'. I have had no call backs on the GFI breakers.

    If you are in fact hard wiring your transformers, then you MUST be aware of a few things.... 1: The need for GFI protection is still required and therefore you must be installing GFI breakers. 2: Some transformer manufacturers will not provide warranty coverage on units that have had the pigtail removed and hardwired. 3: This work must be done by a licensed electrician to be legal.

    Have a great day.
     
  4. Bill S

    Bill S LawnSite Member
    Posts: 184

    And, of course, occassionally you get a faulty gfi plug. Try replacing, this may be the source of your problem!
     
  5. pete scalia

    pete scalia LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 960

    1: The need for GFI protection is still required and therefore you must be installing GFI breakers. 2: Some transformer manufacturers will not provide warranty coverage on units that have had the pigtail removed and hardwired. 3: This work must be done by a licensed electrician to be legal.

    1-Dictate verbatim verse and NEC code that states this.
    2-name the manufacturer and direct me to the literature that states this. The transformer I use has provisions for hardwiring and it doesn't need to have it's power cord cut. It is simply removed and is very much unlike the relic of a transformer you have promoted here.
    3- that's the only thing you've said may be correct
     
  6. Chris J

    Chris J LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,829

    1. If you are a professional, you should have an NEC manual. Look it up for yourself.
    2. We have been through this before. If your transformer manufacturer doesn't worry about it, then neither should you.
    3. May be correct? It is definitely correct.
     
  7. JoeyD

    JoeyD LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,933

    We will warranty our units if you cut the cord and hardwire it in. On our new I Force units they have a hardwire compartment.
     

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