Why Bagged Mulch is a Better Investment

Discussion in 'General Industry Discussions' started by PlantscapeSolutions, Sep 18, 2010.

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  1. PlantscapeSolutions

    PlantscapeSolutions LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,979

    OK...Apparently you don't get it. It's simple landscape customers pay a set fee for the mulching portion of the job no matter how many bags and man hours are required.

    My bread and butter maintenance accounts pay for exactly what is done.

    If you don't comprehend this I don't know what to tell you. It's not that difficult to understand. I've tried my best.
     
  2. yardguy28

    yardguy28 LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,464

    why gouge the landscape clients with a set fee? that means the guy who has landscaping done and needs only 2 yards of mulch will pay the same amount as the lady who had 6 yards of mulch put down.

    that is ridiculous!!!!!!!!!!
     
  3. PlantscapeSolutions

    PlantscapeSolutions LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,979

    I can't vouch for other markets but in Texas I'm CORRECT. Here the price level is low enough for bags that the big guys use it. Just drove by a Valley Crest maintained HOA entrance and what do I see? Pallets of Texas Native Mulch sitting all over the place. If you call one of your amigos down here in Texas they can vouch for what I'm talking about.

    In other small markets where bag prices are too high or bulk mulch is dirt cheap the bulk may be more cost effective. But here with Texas Native being $18.50 yd bulk or only $8.36 more bagged the bean counters chose bagged again and again.

    Some mulch bags are difficult to open and it makes using bags a ***** but that's not the case here. If you have to use a knife to open bags that hurts you efficiency. The bags here pop open with a quick jerk of the bag and dump out smoothly most of the time. If we get a lot of rain the bagged may have a higher moisture content but the bulk will be the same way.
     
  4. PlantscapeSolutions

    PlantscapeSolutions LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,979

    Did you ride the small bus to school? You obviously have no idea how landscape estimates are formulated in this green industry of ours. Clients want a set price when they are getting ready to shell out thousands of dollars for landscaping. If I ask a client to write me a check for tens of thousands of dollars for a down payment they want a concrete figure.

    Using variable figures on maintenance can work sometimes. On landscaping projects where the dollar figures tend to be much larger it does not work.
     
  5. Richard Martin

    Richard Martin LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 14,700

    What was the difference between what you said and I said? I completely understand exactly what you are saying.

    I said: "he is now saying that he agrees to do a job for a specific amount of money. "

    You said: "landscape customers pay a set fee for the mulching portion of the job no matter how many bags and man hours are required."

    It's the same thing. If YOU can't understand that I don't know what to tell YOU.
     
  6. yardguy28

    yardguy28 LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,464

    i didn't ride a bus to school, i walked.....

    i would think just the oposite. if i were to shell out that much i'd rather have a min. and max number hoping it would be the min. number in the end.

    i don't want to hear it's gonna cost $10,000. i'd rather hear it's gonna cost between $8,000 and $10,000 when your talking thousands like that. makes me feel better about the purchasing knowing i might not be spending the full 10k for the job.

    variable figures on maintenance can work SOMETIMES??? how about most of the time. at least for me it does. i estimate ALL my shrub prunning jobs this way and ALL my fall cleanups this way. and it works great. the client knows it's not gonna be less than X but they also it could cost but won't go over Y. and 9 times out of 10 it ends up being the X amount and they are happier because it was the cheaper of the 2 prices.
     
  7. Tennesseepowerstroke

    Tennesseepowerstroke LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 363

    Like it or not. Believe it or not. What you you can legaly tow is what the maker of your truck specified as the GCVWR of your truck, minus what the truck with equipment and occupants weighs. Make a call to your attorney or vehicle service department to find out. You sure don't have a clue as to legal matters.
     
  8. Duffster

    Duffster LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 1,193

    Believe it or not GCWR is not a legal rating.
     
  9. txgrassguy

    txgrassguy LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,083

    As a matter of fact yes it is - after almost ten years in law enforcement with several as a motor vehicle compliance I know first hand when inspecting a vehicle the first thing the po-po looks at is that little sticker on the inside of the driver's door frame.

    Also the VIN # has a specific coding which directly correlates to manufacturer's construction of that particular vehicle and that vehicle's compliance with prevailing federal compliance.

    Many people hear in Texas operate under the disbelief that as long as their truck is capable of moving a trailer they are "legal" and this simply isn't true. The simple matter that there is a relative lack of knowledgeable CMV enforcement officers helps in aiding this incorrect perception. However, get into an accident or pulled over for a compliance inspection, and most drivers get a real expensive surprise in the form of several citations plus the vehicle being pulled out of service right there in order for compliance to be met.

    Additionally hauling that much weight on a F350 or equivalent vehicle of similar size requires the driver to have, at a minimum, a Class B CDL, current DOT card, specific insurance covering heavier hauling and a vehicle with very very specific construction in terms of transmission, rear end gear ratio and amplified braking to be even remotely safe.

    I'm not saying the original poster doesn't have a rare truck in this class which may be legal to operate but it doesn't mean it is safe as it seriously isn't. Maxing out a truck repeatedly in order to haul serious weight leads to accelerated wear on the vehicle, broken components and nasty accidents.
     
  10. Duffster

    Duffster LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 1,193

    Class B LOL:laugh:

    If GCWR was a legal rating it would be on the door tag with the rest of the LEGAL ratings.
     
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