why do lawnmower motors die

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by Jaybrown, Feb 14, 2013.

  1. herler

    herler LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,145

    You mean your own engines or those of other people?
     
  2. 290

    290 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 216

    Stump grinders for the most part use the same twin cylinder engines as the ZTRs do and they eat through engines because of the excess loads put on them. I could be wrong here but another weekness of the the engines we use is they are mere twins. More cylinders may handle the stresses better.
     
  3. Oldtimer

    Oldtimer LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,452

    Most lawn mower engines don't die on their own. They are usually killed.

    Most owners don't RTFM and wouldn't follow it if they did.


    Oldtimer
     
  4. 290

    290 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 216


    While this is VERY true i think hes talking about a natural death.
     
  5. Oldtimer

    Oldtimer LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,452

    To determine cause of death a tech would have to perform a postmortem, otherwise it's just anecdotal.

    Oldtimer
     
  6. 290

    290 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 216

    The topic is so broad one cant help but be....theres no real data on this.
     
  7. piston slapper

    piston slapper LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,240

    There are a few reasons why stump grinders eat engines ...
    On many of them..the engine is operated on an angle..allowing many opportunities to scavenge the oilpump..
    Using the wrong engine will shorten the engine life...the correct Command Twin for stump grinders or any application with extreme sideloads...will have a thrust bearing on the PTO end of the crank..
     
  8. piston slapper

    piston slapper LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,240

    You're absolutely correct....there is a REASON why EVERY engine fails...
    If they didn't have a reason to quit...they wouldn't...
    I have been inside thousands of engines diagnosing failures..from simple rod seizures to complete scatters with hundreds of pieces...they ALL had a smoking gun...I've even been inside engines that the only thing that failed was the guy that diagnosed it..

    The bulk of the engine failures are directly related to improper maintenance or usage...PERIOD.
     
  9. Will P.C.

    Will P.C. LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 966

    Is this true about engaging at full throttle?
     
  10. herler

    herler LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,145

    I have found, with the exception of fuel contaminated oil and perhaps the odd erratic and unpredictable internal failure, that most failures are due to operator error along the lines of improper periodic maintenance, neglect, or plain abuse.

    Just looking at this thread, religious air filters...
    Go pull the dipstick out of an engine on any given day, try it, any engine, anywhere, anytime, start pulling dipsticks.
    Guaranteed you'll pull out more black oil than clean, and when I say black I mean pitch tar black, not in need of an oil change but so dark it's well past overdue for a change, not 5 or 10 hours or days, not even 500 miles but really far south of well past, there's also the great likelyhood that you'll pull more than a few dipsticks showing it's low on oil...

    Now, the operator who doesn't change the oil regularly?
    Also can't probably remember the brand, type and weight that goes in it.
    Thou brand is the least important, type is next but weight is crucial.
    So when it runs low they likely just dump a little of whatever's at hand in there.
    Yeah, who cares.

    Why engines fail.

    I could go on, but the rest of this thread is doing such a fine job already.

    But that's why they fail, however even a perfectly maintained engine won't last forever, some sure do run a good number of years thou.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013

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