Wild Onion

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by LawnoftheMonth, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. LawnoftheMonth

    LawnoftheMonth LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 355

    Some yards here get it, some yards dont. Are there any contributing factors that this weed favors?
     
  2. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,788

    I suspect thin grass in late summer and fall and the following spring, results in a lot more weeds. Wild onion thrives when your Bermuda is dormant. Remember wild onion comes up mostly from bulbs in the ground. May times it is a result of contaminated top soil. Not likely it has a chance to go to seed. Use a surfactant in you weed spray to help wet it. Hit it in the fall if you see it. It does not seem to persist past a couple of mowings up around here--not sure in your climate.
     
  3. rlitman

    rlitman LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,503

    Mine "looked" like it didn't make it past one mowing, but that was just because it blended in pretty well with the grass. Every time I mowed in that spot, it had an onion smell.

    This spring, right after the snow melted, the onions were already starting to grow, and I spot sprayed them with amine 2,4D with a sticker spreader.

    They have a seriously waxy surface that sheds water, so if you just spray them, it rolls off. I used a broom handle to "smack" them around, and the beating/bruising helped them absorb the chemical. After about a month, they started losing color from the ground up. Right now, they're barely green at the tips and yellow to white at the ground.

    The only issue, was I missed the onions that started growing later. Maybe I'll get them next year.
     
  4. LawnoftheMonth

    LawnoftheMonth LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 355

    The strange thing is that it is all over a lawn that is in very good shape, dense, no stressed areas. Just wondering because it's not in any of his neighbors lawns, only his.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2010
  5. CHARLES CUE

    CHARLES CUE LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,087

    use a 3 way and surfant that removes the waxy coating and the will die and turn white in a couple days
    Charles Cue
     
  6. americanlawn

    americanlawn LawnSite Fanatic
    from midwest
    Posts: 5,843

    We had a few in back when we first moved in. I picked them and put 'em on a pizza. Any stragglers didn't last long with regular mowing. Same goes with wild garlic. My 2 cents.
     
  7. Think Green

    Think Green LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,746

    My teens picked the tops off of about 20 clumps and we grilled some steak with wild onion on top. What a great taste!!!!!

    Blanket spray the lawn if possible after cutting the onions with the mower. Allow a couple of days of regrowth as the new shoots will be tender and less covered with wax as the more hardened stalks. Use a surfactant with the 3-way or 2-4D it will make a difference.
    Cutting them with the mower is just hiding their existence. They will spread by bulb unions and come back year after year.
    I have found that wild onions do come from contaminated soils or are uncovered from torrential rainy seasons. They lay dormant until the right temps and conditions to grow.
     
  8. Turfdoctor1

    Turfdoctor1 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 705

    I agree about the contaminated soil. I have a neighborhood with about eight 1.5 acre lawns. Some have no onion, one has ridiculously covered, or was. They come back year after year. Nothing I can do about it, but explain to the customer that they cannot be prevented. As others have said, mow em, let em grow for 2 days, spray with good sticker.

    The best thing you can spray is manor. It'll knock them out great. But, I can't afford that.
     
  9. Think Green

    Think Green LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,746

    Turf,
    I haven't priced Metsulfuron.................how much is it in your area??
    I won't even touch some of the higher priced products as it can be out of the prospects of our service plans.
    I had 4 calls today with lawns that are completely pimpled with wild onions. I know that it is not a one shot treatment and the customer shies away from the multiple cost applications.
     
  10. LawnoftheMonth

    LawnoftheMonth LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 355

    I sprayed them with celsius the other day, my trimec southern(2-4d) does nothing to them. The celcius worked on the ones I had in my lawn a few weeks ago. Normally they dont last long enough here to be concerned with, it's just been very cool lately and they are lingering since the grass isnt growing and people arent mowing much.

    Thanks for your thoughts! It just bothers me that only one yard has them, and none of his neighbors have any at all (some are my customers, some arent), all houses were built at the same time, on the same soil. I know the wild onions wont last long, my customer is just bummed, thinking he did something wrong.
     

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