Will it wash away?

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by Giragosian Landscape, Apr 10, 2008.

  1. Giragosian Landscape

    Giragosian Landscape LawnSite Member
    Posts: 15

    One of my accounts wants some work to be done in the front of their lawn. There is a slope that goes down to the street. I think the slope is about 15 feet going from the edge of the lawn (which is flat) to the sand area before the street. The slope is at about 35 degrees and it has a ton of weeds covering it. They don't want to grow grass or put anything fancy on the slope. I thought that maybe putting down fabric after getting rid of the weeds and throwing mulch over it would do it but i am afraid that it would wash away down the slope during a rain storm. If i throw mulch down without the fabric, the weeds might return... Any suggestions?



    Thanks guys...

    Andrew
     
  2. Stuttering Stan

    Stuttering Stan LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,503

    Anyone else confused? How about pics so we can try to understand?
     
  3. Giragosian Landscape

    Giragosian Landscape LawnSite Member
    Posts: 15

    im at school right now and i dont have any pics. I do apologize if it does sound confusing but in simple terms, should i put mulch down on a steep slope (35 degrees) with landscape fabric? I am asking for help because i don't know if it will wash away when it rains..


    again, sorry for the confusion



    Andrew
     
  4. Isobel

    Isobel LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 548

    you should be fine. I've spread mulch on slopes like that.

    the fabric will keep the weeds down for a little while. but weed seeds can just grow in the mulch.

    I personally hate fabric because it sterilizes the soil underneath.
     
  5. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    Are you going to put plantings in the mulch? Plants and mulch hold each other with little maintenance.

    I would forget the fabric because when weeds grow in the mulch they really grab hold of the fabric. (just 1 more reason to avoid fabric)

    I'd use a pre-m instead.
     
  6. Tom Tom

    Tom Tom LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,276



    google mulchgard
     
  7. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    Your long term proposal to the HO should be a ground cover planting. I don't know what works in NH, but I would assume there is some sort of ground ivy, etc. that will spread out, but not up. That bank is going to be a source of frustration and erosion until you get some root system established in it. I would propose planting a ground ivy'ish plant on 2 foot centers with a quickly decomposing mulch (aged hardwood chips) spread a couple inches thick (no fabric).
     
  8. Giragosian Landscape

    Giragosian Landscape LawnSite Member
    Posts: 15

    Your long term proposal to the HO should be a ground cover planting. I don't know what works in NH, but I would assume there is some sort of ground ivy, etc. that will spread out, but not up. That bank is going to be a source of frustration and erosion until you get some root system established in it. I would propose planting a ground ivy'ish plant on 2 foot centers with a quickly decomposing mulch (aged hardwood chips) spread a couple inches thick (no fabric).


    I like your idea with this but the HO doesn't want maintenance with the slope and they don't want any planting on the slope. I am thinking that maybe i should just go with cleaning out the weeds and putting down pre-m and mulch... haven't mad a decision yet...


    Keep the post coming!


    Thanks again...
    Andrew
     
  9. Isobel

    Isobel LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 548

    if he doesn't want groundcover, that's one thing. but a good groundcover--ivy, pachy, etc, won't need any maintenance. just plant it and let it grow. doesn't need trimming or anything else.
     
  10. PSUturf

    PSUturf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 663

    Explain to them that anything with plants will require maintenance. Even rip rap on the slope will require some maintenance if leaves accumulate on it
     

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