1. Missed the live Ask the Expert event?
    Not to worry. Check out the archived thread of the Q&A with Ken Hutcheson, President of U.S. Lawns, and the LawnSite community in the Franchising forum .

    Dismiss Notice

Winter Rye Seed, most bang for our bucks?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Stinger, Oct 15, 2000.

  1. Stinger

    Stinger LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 252

    We currently use Lesco's Eagle Blend rye seed. I've tried others and like this the best around residental homes and highly visiable areas. Especially for the dark green color & fine blade it produces (stripes great too). What do all of you that overseed use? Also I'm paying $1 PER LB here in Texas, how about in your neck of the woods?
  2. HOMER

    HOMER LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,183

    I am also interested in overseeding several sites this year. I don't think I'll be paying $1.00 per p[ond though. I think I'll go to Wallyworld an pay $9.00 for a 25# bag of annual rye grass. I asked an ex-helper that now works at a golf course what they used and he said they bought theirs from Tyco????? They used 2 different types, one for the greens and a cheaper version for the tees. I was hoping to find out what Stone meant the other night when he said to use triple rye, but haven't found it yet around here. The annual rye looks good when cut, I was just looking for something that would stand out. I'm open for suggestions as well.


  3. Alan

    Alan Member
    Posts: 1,185

    Are you talking winter rye, which is a grain/erosion control or annual rye which is a temporary lawn grass?
  4. Mr.Ziffel

    Mr.Ziffel LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 291

    Check out the above web site. Their prices are very high but the site is full of good info. I spread 350lbs. of a rye mix on Sept.28 and it's 2.5 inches tall now--I'm searching for a new mower so I'm ready for it! You want a blend because the annual rye will germinate and green up rapidly, last through the winter and then die--in the meantime the perrenial rye and other seeds in the mix will be growing and getting strong to make it through the summer--they can then spread throughout the lawn using whatever process they use filling it out and making it a thing of beauty to be mowed regularly, thus generating income. Kinda like the Lion King and the circle of life.
  5. Mark_Christopher

    Mark_Christopher LawnSite Member
    Posts: 41

    Winter Rye and Annual rye are the same thing. Annual rye is used for errosion control on hillsides here in california. About 5 years back all the local companies in my area sold out of Annual rye (winter rye) due to all the fires we had. Annual rye (winter rye) is used here on bermuda, st augustine, when they go dormant for the winter. It's quick germinating 5-7 days. I plant most of my Annual Rye lawns in mid October - Nov and in 2 weeks from planting, their lawns are looking great......

  6. Alan

    Alan Member
    Posts: 1,185

    Mark Christopher, maybe in common usage annual and winter rye are thought to be the same thing, but if you go to a seed supplier who handles both lawn and forage grasses you're in for a big surprise. Winter rye seeds are big,, on the order of grains of rice, annual rye is a small seed, on the order of other turf grasses. Annual is often used to give a winter growth in warm season grasses, applied by overseeding methods. Winter rye is commonly used as a very quick and rough cover grass around construction sites and along highway work. Winter rye is also used as a "green manure" crop in gardening. It has a very coarse growth and will go to seed very early the following year and can be harvested as a grain at that point.
  7. Alan is correct. My father was a truck farmer and I would sow the rye with one of those funky old chest spreaders.

    Much bigger seed and not a choice for a home lawn.
  8. Poplen

    Poplen LawnSite Member
    Posts: 34

    I have two customers who have bermuda grass and want a green lawn for the winter. Should I proceed with aeration and scalping the yard for seeding (rye) or just try and seed and fertilize through the bermuda?

  9. Stinger

    Stinger LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 252

    1) Homer & Mr. Ziffel, thanks for sticking to and answering my question.

    2) Alan, the Lesco brand I'm using is an ANNUAL rye seed intended for cool season growth. Not a perennial or anything else.

    3) Poplen, progressively lower your cutting height for the next few cuts. Then when you have it low enough and dethatched you may aerate and overseed. When your rye comes up a couple weeks later, go ahead and fertilize.

    Now back to my original question what brand/type of rye seed do you use and what are you paying for it?

    Thank You,

    [Edited by Stinger on 10-17-2000 at 03:17 PM]
  10. Mr.Ziffel

    Mr.Ziffel LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 291

    I realized that I didn't post the price of my blend. After shopping around, I paid $1.50/pound and that was at the Farmers Supply. Prices ranged upwards of $3.50/pound for a special dwarf rye to an average of $2.50/pound at other places. What really burns me is that between here [north of Seattle] and south to Oregon, much of the cool season grass seed used throughout the country is grown. You'd think we could get a better price, but last year when we used a pasture grass mix of rye and clover we still paid over $.90/pound! I didn't even think of checking out WalMart although I sure will next time--I bet it comes from the same place that the stuff I used did.

    Good point on sticking to the topic. I know that in a former life we were in on the early days of email/computer use and we ended up having to have special training for folks to realize how easy it was for them to get off topic and/or emotional about issues and what kind of impact it has on the people receiving a strong response when all they were trying to do was be helpful.

Share This Page