Winterizing equipment

Discussion in 'Starting a Lawn Care Business' started by Ejs71, Dec 3, 2012.

  1. jrs.landscaping

    jrs.landscaping LawnSite Silver Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 2,716

    Not really an option at -30.
     
  2. Ejs71

    Ejs71 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 12

    Where is a good place to buy engine fogger? Never heard of it
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  3. Blades Lawn Maintenance

    Blades Lawn Maintenance LawnSite Bronze Member
    Male, from Baton Rouge, La
    Posts: 1,233

    I didn't say what works for me would for work for you. It's just what I do
     
  4. jsslawncare

    jsslawncare LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,674

    I run all of my junk once a week too. And it works for me too.
     
  5. rbljack

    rbljack LawnSite Senior Member
    from Texas
    Posts: 702

    it should be available at an automotive store, or a walmart, parts store etc. its basically an oily spray that will coat the rings and pistons
     
  6. jrs.landscaping

    jrs.landscaping LawnSite Silver Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 2,716

    I wish we could do that up here. In the spring we have a long checklist to go through with each mower because they sit for so long.
     
  7. Blades Lawn Maintenance

    Blades Lawn Maintenance LawnSite Bronze Member
    Male, from Baton Rouge, La
    Posts: 1,233

    Yeah I understand...how long is yalls winter
     
  8. jrs.landscaping

    jrs.landscaping LawnSite Silver Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 2,716

    December 1 to usually the middle of March. We noramally have one or two weeks of REALLY cold weather in the negatives. Other than that it hovers around 20. Still too cold to try to start equipment because it's harder on the machine. Around the end of March we dig everything out and it takes about a week to go through every machine to get them ready to mow.
     
  9. rlitman

    rlitman LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,540

    The first thing I do with equipment that doesn't have a fuel shutoff, is install a fuel shutoff. A plastic in-line valve installed just before the carb (or just before the fuel pump if the equipment has one), is a great $5 investment.

    Two things I do that I didn't see mentioned above.
    1) when I run the machine dry, I will choke it just as it starts to stumble. That will let it run the gas level in the carb even lower.
    2) for a machine with a recoil start, once I've fogged the cylinder and replaced the plug, I gently pull the rope until I feel compression, so the valves are closed when I store it.
     
  10. rbljack

    rbljack LawnSite Senior Member
    from Texas
    Posts: 702

    true enough on the fuel shut off...they are cheap. I did mention the choke thing on handheld equipment, but I should have included that for all equipment with chokes. And that is a very important step really. if you dont get that gas out of the carb, it can cause headaches in the spring!

    And thats a great tip ive never thought off in #2! I have always pulled the starter cord a few times, to coat the cylinder, but never thought to ensure the valves were closed aftere putting the spark plug back in. Great tip there and you can bet ill be adding that to my process! Thanks..
     

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