Winterizing - What's Involved???

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by SLC LLC, Sep 25, 2006.

  1. SLC  LLC

    SLC LLC LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 668

    I am in the lawn care business, for the most part strictly mowing. With the number of clients that we serve, I think it is important to stick with what we can handle and be the best at what we do. However, I have been seeing all of these winterizing threads on irrigation systems. I do not look to get into this business, but would like to have an understanding of what this is, what is involved, etc. so that I at least have a clue of what is going on in other areas of my clients lawns. Can anyone provide me with any insight? Thanks in advance - keep up all the good work fellas.
     
  2. Mdirrigation

    Mdirrigation LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,774

    Its secret stuff , we could tell you , but if we did we would have to kill you .
    Its better that you dont know ..
     
  3. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,041

    You set your compressor to 160 psi........
     
  4. If you do a search you will find what you need......
     
  5. DanaMac

    DanaMac LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,156

    To quickly answer your question..........
    An air compressor is hooked up to the system, the zone valves are opened up (usually 2-4 at once depending on the compressor size), and the compressed air forces the water through the pipes and out the sprinkler heads. Water expands when it freezes, causing cracks and broken pipes, heads, valves, etc. By evacuating the water, you eliminate the possibility of freeze damage.
     
  6. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,041

    Then you change the oil in the rotor gear cases.....
     
  7. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    ... and grease the controller. :)
     
  8. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,794

    Don't forget to insulate the wiring to protect it from freezing as well. I forgot to that at my house and it blew and electricity leaked all over the floor. It was a shocking mess.
     
  9. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,041

    Old Toro hydraulic controllers could actually die from cold weather, despite the almost-incredible durability of the 1/8" ID control tubing. Especially when they were located in the garage, and someone left the door open overnight.

    Nothing like a frantic phone call from someone who just discovered a leaking controller on the day a home is supposed to be sold.

    "How distressing. Happen to have a thousand dollars cash on hand?"
     
  10. DanaMac

    DanaMac LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,156

    Could this be why there are not many hydraulic systems in cold weather climates? Freezing tubes and controllers. I know there are a few here, even though I haven't seen them yet, but not many.
     

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