wiring mess up

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by greenmonster304, Oct 30, 2007.

  1. greenmonster304

    greenmonster304 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,018

    today i went to winterize a house we took over from another company a few weeks ago. when i went inside to unplug the controller i found that the previous company had ran an 18 ga wire to the clock for power (110 volts). this is not kosher but here is my question to you guys. should i call the old company and let them know that their amegos are doing things that could burn down a house? would you guys appreciate phone call if your guys were doing this or wold you tell me to mind my business?
     
  2. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,619

    Call the electricians & have them do it right....inform the client, don't dink
    with the previous slimeball. Tho a call to Labor & Industries mite work.
     
  3. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,619

    We leave the clock powered up, a little heat keeps the micro circuits happy.:)
     
  4. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,799

    I would be willing to bet that the company knew that was done.

    I've used 18 gauge to bridge the 24v terminals in a pinch, but never to run 110.

    What sort of hack install is that? Are you sure its 110? Did they splice a pigtail onto it?
     
  5. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,619

    Elitist........
     
  6. greenmonster304

    greenmonster304 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,018

    it went: 110 outlet>pigtail>15' of 18/4>ProC transformer
     
  7. Jason Rose

    Jason Rose LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,858

    Is the amperage useage of the controler more than 10 amps? I sort-of fail to see the problem with using 18 ga. wire for a 110V. circut. Look at MOST lamps and appliances, most all use 18ga.

    The hang-up would be if the wire used was not 600V. wire (normally used for 110V) or if the splices used were exposed.
     
  8. greenmonster304

    greenmonster304 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,018

    the connections were just wire nutted and hanging there and the wire was the 18/4 thermostat wire. i think most wire for 110 is at least 14 ga. what they did was move the controller from basement to out side and just used the old zone wire that was extra because of the move.
     
  9. Jason Rose

    Jason Rose LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,858

    Ah, well i'm not going to lie, that's a bit sketchy!

    No, not all wire is rated for use with 110 volts, things like thermostat wire and controler valve wire is NOT, it's low voltage only. Not to say it won't conduct the power, the insulation just isn't suited for the dangers of 110 + volts.

    As for what size wires will handle 110 volts. Pretty much any gage wire will. I see 24 gage routinely used, more common is 18 and 16. The drawback to using smaller conducters like this is that they are rated for less "flow" then the breaker they are attached too. If there's a problem with the smaller wires, that are connected to a 15 amp breaker, then YES, there's a possibilty of a fire. anything smaller than 14 ga, should have a fuse on it based on the size of the wire.
     
  10. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,799

    Heh, usually I used it to do a quick and dirty solenoid/field wiring versus timer check on wiring issues. If I can fire the zone with a jumper wire, then its time to ditch the timer.
     

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