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Would this be wrong?

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by big_country, Mar 13, 2007.

  1. big_country

    big_country LawnSite Member
    Posts: 118

    I recently gave a customer a price on aerating and overseeding, I have done some work for them before keep in mind. Well I was out that way today and noticed that they had their yard aerated. Last fall was the first season for aerating for me, so would it be wrong to call them up and just ask if they wouldn't mind to tell me what they were charged. Would that be wrong to do, I am just curious were my prices stand.
  2. LawnSharks

    LawnSharks LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 300

    If they are a current "customer" of yours...absolutely! You should have a good enough report with them for them to be honest. Tell them you don't want to miss any other opportunities with "any" of your good customers and they should appreciate your honesty and tell you.
    Unfortunately, we've all had this to happen. Best thing...try to head it off next season; just don't dog your competition because they may be very pleased his work.
    Good luck!
  3. big_country

    big_country LawnSite Member
    Posts: 118

    No, I am not mad or anything, and they did a pretty good job. I just wish to see how much cheaper they were. Thanks for the reply, anybody else have a comment.

    MILSINC LawnSite Member
    Posts: 175

    in my honest opinion, who cares what the other guy charges? you know what you have to charge, and if the customer can't swing it, tough luck.
    i would never lower my prices to be closer to the competition.. that is one of the first signs of weakness.
  5. PaperCutter

    PaperCutter LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,943

    I think it's totally worth knowing!
    1- your pricing can't exist in a vacuum. If the market is shifting lower, you need to know to be able to position yourself to sell at *your* prices

    2- If it's not a significant amount and a long-term client price-shopped you, that's a red flag about the solidity of your relationship.

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