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Wright Stander Question

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by soonernation, Aug 5, 2004.

  1. soonernation

    soonernation LawnSite Member
    from Okc OK
    Posts: 63

    I am doing some research on some ZTR's and this wright stand up looks really tempting. I only have 3 big commercial accounts right now and don't think I need a big ZTR. (I was thinking 42" at the most.) I need something manuverable and as easy as possible to get in and out of back gates. The sales person said "for $300 more dollars you can get a 42" Yazoo Keys and be able to sit down and it is just as manuverable". So I thought I would ask you all that are out there in the trenches with me and not in an air conditioned show room trying to earn commision what you think. What do you think of the stand up? Is there a sit down that is just as verstile like he says? Why haven't I seen a whole lot of them around? It looks as sturdy and well built as any of the machines I saw. Please give me some feedback.
  2. txlawnking

    txlawnking LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,905

    I don't even own a wright, But I do own a Surfer ( stand up machine ) and I'd take either over the Kees any day... VERY manuvereable..
  3. brucec32

    brucec32 LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,403

    There are a lot more things to consider on those mowers than just standing or sitting, and maneuverability. A stander will turn faster, zip in and out of small parcels a little faster, and has other advantages in terms of size, but you will tire faster standing than sitting, despite the protests to the contrary from some zealots. Just use your common sense. And beware of advice from 18 y/o's who are fresh legged, full of energy, and have mowed for a whole year and a half. You will find fatigue your biggest limitation to income, not time. Every unit of wear you put on your body today you will feel later on down the line. If your goal is to quickly be out of the field and sitting in an office, I'd suggest any of about a thousand better fields to do that in. Hiring employees in this business to the degree that you're no longer a field worker can be done, but the stress/time/reward ratio isn't great until youv'e been at it quite a while. Unless you're a super salesman, in which case go get a sales job.

    My best combination is a good ZTR and a cheap small wb for the few lots it won't handle. If you're doing neighborhoods of tiny lots, a stander may beat having to walk or ride a sulky. But I assume Oklahoma is pretty flat, so I would go with a ZTR and save my energy for trimming and other tasks.

    I have almost bought a Stander a couple of times, but as a replacement for the walk behind, not as my wide area mower. Be sure you can live with a fixed deck, though. A ZTR will have a "quick adjust" deck height handle you can adjust on the fly. You have to stop cutting to adjust height on the stander, and even that is within a limited range. Some areas of the country require mowing at ranges from mabye 2-4" on the same lawn, so that makes a stander hard to use there. A stander with a quick deck height adjust system, like their sentar, would be very competitive. Still, I like to ride.
  4. Itsgottobegreen

    Itsgottobegreen LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,177

    Well I am a wright believer. I wouldn't buy a Kees even if its the last mower on earth. (buddy had one and I had to re weld the frame twice in two different places.)

    One reason that you don't see alot of them around, because there are very few Wright dealers. I had to talk my dealer into selling them. Give it some time and everyone will be selling them.

    The stander is way more maneuverable than a ZTR and walk behind. Because of its short length it can turn around in its own width. A ZTR is longer than its width. Walk behinds are way longer than their width w/velke. Since a stander has a rounded trim side, I can get right up against stuff, so I have very little trimming to do. I know people with the 42" stander and claim it still is faster than their 48" hydro walk behind w/velke. Nothing can keep up with them on small compact lawns.

    It does have a down side of not having a floating deck. But thats why wright builds the sentar. It is a stander with a seat and a floating deck. I own both.

    I use my 52" stander on postage stamp lawns to 3 acres jobs. Does very well on both.

    Take one out on a demo for a day. Run it for at least 3 hours. You will hate it for the 1st 15 mins, then you will start to like it after you can see what it can do. Trust me.

    By the way bruce I am 19 and have been doing this since I was 13. I have owned a stander since I was 15. (I was the youngest person ever to buy a stander at the time) So I know what I am talking about.
  5. Acute Cut

    Acute Cut LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 980

    Everyone here has some great points. IGBG: Yes it can turn in tighter areas, but how often is that a necessity? Bruce: you must be getting old and feeling it like i am man. :D

    I would say try and demo for longer than three hours. I just finished my second week of the demo time for TURF article and i think i gained alot more knowledge this week than last. There is a definite learning curve to them. I agree with bruce about the fixed deck thing. I'm trying to get a demo set up of the sentar just for that reason. The fixed deck has been a little difficult here in our area. I also did my first REALLY bumpy lawn yesterday. That was....... quite interesting. I would say this machine is fun, but not the most user friendly vs some other mowers. Drive rocks, blades......... Well lets just say i got a rather long article already started on this machine.
  6. Del9175

    Del9175 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 352

    I bought my Stander because I wanted the most compact ZTR I could get with a 52" deck. I think Standers are great mowers but to be honest, I would rather be sitting. I do like the fact that they are easy to jump off of to maybe pick up something or pull a weed though.
  7. txlawnking

    txlawnking LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,905

    Acute, Ihear what your saying about the beating you get on a stand-up machine, as my surfer doesn't ride the best either ( even with the low pressure I run in the tires ) But, for small to medium size lawns I don't think you could out produce a Stand up machine with a hydro WB or a ZTR... The only time I wish I could sit down, is on BIG Realtor jobs involving lots of bumps on sub standard lawns, It really boils down to what YOU need. DEMO it on YOUR property, and see what fills the bill...
  8. EastProLawn

    EastProLawn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,110

    I love my Wright Stander.....no more to say
  9. soonernation

    soonernation LawnSite Member
    from Okc OK
    Posts: 63

    So far I am getting great feedback from everyone and it is greatly appreciated. It looks like the demo is my best option as always. Lucky for me there are 3 dealers in my area that carry wright but they also carry Dixie Chopper, Scag, Yazoo, and Toro ZTR's. I have just hit the 100 yard marker and just want to make the best decision on my first ZTR. I have a good stock of 21" and walk behinds' but I feel it's time to go bigger. Is it best to go big first ( like a 60") or start out with a 42" or 48"? I see a lot of posts with 1 and 2 man opperations that have a big and a smaler ZTR. Which one comes first? Thank you for all of your posts.
  10. Itsgottobegreen

    Itsgottobegreen LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,177

    If you have a small walk behind now. Then get the bigger ZTR first, then the smaller one.

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