Yard Is Destroyed....help

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by cenlo, May 19, 2006.

  1. cenlo

    cenlo LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ontario
    Posts: 322

    This yard is in Northern Ontario. It was in pretty good shape last year. It originally had , kentucy blue, creeping fescue, and rye mix. End of last season it seemed ok......and now;)
    Please help, the customers are not too happy.
    Btw, the nieghbours yards are fine.

    Thanks, Don

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  2. GreenUtah

    GreenUtah LawnSite Senior Member
    from SLC, UT
    Posts: 866

    well, I see the shallow aeration holes and the soil doesn't look all packed out...water? fert? bug damage? what's been done between when it looked good and now?
     
  3. cenlo

    cenlo LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ontario
    Posts: 322

    Just good ol winter!
     
  4. upidstay

    upidstay LawnSite Bronze Member
    from CT
    Posts: 1,326

    No way to tell what did it at this point. It needs to be reseeded. Aerate it, then slice seed it. Might not hurt to spray the entire thing with round up first.
    Good luck
     
  5. GreenUtah

    GreenUtah LawnSite Senior Member
    from SLC, UT
    Posts: 866

    hmmm...so then your theory says that all the lawns in the area would have the same damage. Actually, was it seeded in real late, leaving just small, tender plants going into the winter? when was that aeration done?..we know a little bit about snow and winter here(I know, you're thinking we're all desert, aren't you!) after all, we hosted the last north american winter olympics and not 20 minutes from where I sit, snowfall each season can be over 500 inches..our lawns don't look like that after each winter..lol
     
  6. cenlo

    cenlo LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ontario
    Posts: 322

    Actually it was left over the winter. No, I don't think you live in the desert. And no I didn't forget to say it was overseeded.

    So..... it was not overseeded or areated (the holes in the on pic are from a ph tester. The lawn was good last fall and nothing (to my knowledge) has been done since!

    And maybe try saying something positive in your next post!:) All I wanted was some advice.
     
  7. Mike33

    Mike33 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,649

    I would ferlize 18-24-12 about 4-5 lbs per k 50% release you can not hurt it. Lime 40 per k and over seed with a tall fescue. Im not sure what kent. blue will do in that climate. Im sure you still dont have good germination up there yet with such cool evenings we have here in Md.
    Mike
     
  8. cenlo

    cenlo LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ontario
    Posts: 322

    Thanks, I think I will kill it off, add the lime, and re-sod the area.
     
  9. GreenUtah

    GreenUtah LawnSite Senior Member
    from SLC, UT
    Posts: 866

    And all I was asking you for was more information so that I could give you some! lol..resodding can be a spendy proposition that may not give you a long term solution if you don't identify what took down, what was, a healthy lawn in the first place. Does the soil in your area typically require lime? How old was the existing turf? Shade? Irrigation? what was the difference between this lawn and others in the neighborhood that made it through winter just fine? What a pig that would be to resod and have the exact same thing happen again over next winter!
     
  10. cenlo

    cenlo LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ontario
    Posts: 322

    This area normally requires lime, ph is usually low. I agree with you that I should determine what happened to the lawn prior to sodding or seeding. I have posted here and a few other spots and have asked others in the area with no luck so far. The problem is this happened to a great client so for 130 rolls of sod at $2.00/roll, and a days labour I might as well sod. I just hope it was something the homeowner did and is not telling me.
     

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